Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Can EXE generated by cx_freeze be completely decompiled back to readable Python code?

I've used cx-freeze to convert a python script to an executable. Is it possible to reverse that? Can I get my python script from the binary cx-freeze has generated?

EDIT. This is a practical question. I really need to recover one cx-freezed executable to a more-less readable form. Does anyone have a recipie of doing it?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by delnan, zeekay, casperOne Feb 23 '12 at 19:17

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

add comment

1 Answer

Any 'frozen' PY application can be disassembled but not really decompiled. With enough time and patience someone would be able to reverse-engineer nearly any program (including yours).

Edit Correction as per comments below.

share|improve this answer
    
"can not be really decompiled" -- [citation needed] –  delnan Feb 21 '12 at 15:56
    
Can one recover the python bytecode from the cx-freezed binary? If so, then I'd try to use this tool: github.com/gstarnberger/uncompyle, which claims to be able to restore code by reading the bytecode. –  facha Feb 21 '12 at 15:58
1  
Yes, python bytecode can be recovered from the frozen exe. This is disassembling NOT decompiling. Can you then return that bytecode to a readable format? Yes. Will it be the original source code? No. –  PenguinCoder Feb 21 '12 at 16:01
    
Does anyone know how to do that? –  facha Feb 21 '12 at 16:21
1  
@facha: The Python bytecode is stored in a zip file. Depending on how you've frozen it, that might be a separate file with the executable, or it might be appended to the executable. If you can't see a zip file, try unzipping the executable itself. –  Thomas K Feb 22 '12 at 12:46
show 1 more comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.