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So this is tough. When calling a method directly, this refers to the containing object while when calling from string conversion, this refers to "window" (i believe, i could still be completely wrong).

Could anyone explain this to me?

What will happen is a javascript error AFTER the first alert statement (that means direct call worked fine with how _this was defined)

/**
 *  converts a string to a function
 */
function stStringToFunction(string) {
    var fnList = string.split(".");
    var currentFn = window;
    var nextFn;
    while(currentFn !== undefined && (nextFn = fnList.shift())) {
        currentFn = currentFn[nextFn];  
    } 
    return currentFn;
}

//An example library
UnderstandingThis.ui.Component1 = {
    performTask1: function(options) {
        var settings = {
                opt1: true,
                opt2: false
            },
            _this = this;

        $.extend(settings, options);

        _this._PrivateTask1(settings);
    },
    _PrivateTask1: function(settings) {
        //Some sweet stuff here!
        alert("Private task1: " + settings.from);
    }
}
UnderstandingThis.ui.Component1.performTask1({from: "direct"});
stStringToFunction("UnderstandingThis.ui.Component1.performTask1")({from: "string-to-function"});

My lack of explanation required an edit: 2/21/2012 9:56 AM (Montana)

So the problem is that the faux library (UnderstandingThis.ui.Component1) contains a function that uses _this (which is set to this) and works fine when doing a direct method call. By that i mean in javascript calling UnderstandingThis.ui.Component1.performTask1(). But if i call this same task via a string conversion stStringToFunction("UnderstandingThis.ui.Component1.performTask1")() _this refers to window. But to me that does not make sense. I have only been doing javascript for 1.5 years and these little nuances (coming from Java/C#) are difficult to understand.

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2  
What's the question? –  Šime Vidas Feb 21 '12 at 16:42
2  
What error? there are too much undefined in the question. humor++ –  gdoron Feb 21 '12 at 16:42
    
Sorry, let me define the error –  Michael Feb 21 '12 at 16:53
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your initial assertion:

When calling a method directly, this refers to the containing object

is not really true. The this pseudo-variable is bound based on the object reference used to get to the function (if any). If you instantiate a function as a property value of some object, and then call it by reference via that object property, then yes, this is bound to that object. However, if you copy the function as a value to a property of another object, then a call via that other object will have that object as this (it's always a "Who's on first?" issue when discussing this topic :-).

In any case, you can use .call() or .apply() to force the this value to be whatever you want, regardless of how you get to the function. The bottom line is that in JavaScript there is never any inherent relationship between a function and any particular object. The binding of this is determined at every function call.

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You provided some great information. I understand where i was wrong. You and quentin have same answers, yours is just more generalized. –  Michael Feb 21 '12 at 17:02
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If you call:

foo.bar()

Then inside bar, this is foo.

If you:

var baz = { bar: foo.bar };
baz.bar();

Then inside bar, this is baz.

If you were to:

var bar = foo.bar;
bar();

Then inside bar, this is window (because it is the default object).

Your function extracts the function from its context and then calls it (so this is window).

share|improve this answer
    
An excellent answer, but maybe not to this question, cuz I couldn't get the "question part" in it. –  gdoron Feb 21 '12 at 16:47
    
This is very close to the question. This is a great explanation. My string to function conversion basically does the "bar()" function call... –  Michael Feb 21 '12 at 16:55
    
The only reason why i did not accept yours is that yours was a very practical example, but did not lead me to a deeper understanding of this. I understand where i went wrong in my example, but @Pointy explained how this is generated with more depth. I did give you a vote up, your answer was good. –  Michael Feb 21 '12 at 17:06
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The problem is exactly what you thought, this in the second call refers to the window. Here is a possible workaround, but personally i'd do things in a different way. Fiddle here http://jsfiddle.net/LsH7V/

/**
 *  converts a string to a function
 */
function stStringToFunction(string) {
    var fnList = string.split(".");
    var currentFn = window;
    var nextFn;
    while(currentFn !== undefined && (nextFn = fnList.shift())) {
        currentFn = currentFn[nextFn];  
    }
    return currentFn;
}

//An example library
UnderstandingThis = {};
UnderstandingThis.ui = {};
UnderstandingThis.ui.Component1 = {

    performTask1: function(options) {
        var settings = {
                opt1: true,
                opt2: false
            };
        if(typeof _this === 'undefined'){    
            _this = this;
            console.log(this);
        }

        $.extend(settings, options);

        _this._PrivateTask1(settings);
    },
    _PrivateTask1: function(settings) {
        //Some sweet stuff here!
        alert("Private task1: " + settings.from);
    }
}
UnderstandingThis.ui.Component1.performTask1({from: "direct"});
stStringToFunction("UnderstandingThis.ui.Component1.performTask1")({from: "string-to-function"});
share|improve this answer
    
could you please show me how you do this. Code is code, there is no "right" way of doing things. (I am not justifying crappy code, but good code can be done several ways) –  Michael Feb 21 '12 at 17:01
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