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Nicolai Josuttis, in his book "The C++ Standard Library - A Tutorial and Reference", writes, at page 44, the following paragraph :

According to the concept of auto_ptrs, it is possible to transfer ownership into a function by using a constant reference. This is very dangerous because people usually expect that an object won't get modified when you pass it as a constant reference. Fortunately, there was a late design decision that made auto_ptrs less dangerous. By some tricky implementation techniques, transfer of ownership is not possible with constant references. In fact, you can't change the ownership of any constant auto_ptr: …

If is not possible to change ownership with a constant reference, why the expressions "This is very dangerous" and "less dangerous" above ?

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He was describing the scenario before they made it not possible to change ownership with a const reference. –  ildjarn Feb 21 '12 at 17:00
    
@ildjarn But what about this sentence "Fortunately, there was a late design decision that made auto_ptrs less dangerous". –  Belloc Feb 21 '12 at 17:03
    
Right, they made it not possible to change ownership with a const reference -- you're asking why that is less dangerous? –  ildjarn Feb 21 '12 at 17:04
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My native tongue is not english. But I presume there is nothing dangerous in this case. So why the expression "less dangerous" ? –  Belloc Feb 21 '12 at 17:06
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The fact that the copy constructor (which takes a non-const reference) can transfer ownership at all is still dangerous, just not as dangerous as if the copy constructor took a const reference. This is why std::auto_ptr<> has been frowned on for years (with boost::scoped_ptr<> and boost::shared_ptr<> taking supremacy of the C++03 smart pointers) and is now officially deprecated in C++11 in favor of std::unique_ptr<>. –  ildjarn Feb 21 '12 at 17:08

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Summing up comments:

"This is very dangerous" refers to when std::auto_ptr<>'s copy constructor (which transfers ownership) took a const reference argument – this is a complete violation of const-correctness.

"Less dangerous" refers to the fact that the copy constructor (which now takes a non-const reference) can transfer ownership at all; this is still dangerous, just not as dangerous as when the copy constructor took a const reference.

This aspect of std::auto_ptr<> is universally considered a flaw in the class, to the extent that it's largely considered unusably broken. Consequently, boost::scoped_ptr<> and boost::shared_ptr<> are largely considered the "real" smart pointers of C++03, and in C++11 std::auto_ptr<> is deprecated altogether in favor of std::unique_ptr<>.

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"This aspect of std::auto_ptr<> is universally considered a flaw in the class": I disagree. It is fine as long as you know what you're doing. Without move semantics, it is impossible to return a non-reference-counted smart pointer from a function. std::auto_ptr<> gets around that problem. Yes, it breaks the concept of "copy" to do so, but that's what the language provided, so that was the only alternative. If you've got access to unique_ptr then obviously you should drop auto_ptr. But as long as you're aware how it behaves, it's perfectly usable. –  Nicol Bolas Feb 21 '12 at 17:29
    
@Nicol : The fact that its semantics are non-obvious (and contrary to the rest of the standard library) isn't a flaw? ;-] Error-prone trumps "usable" in my book -- it's hard to screw up usage of std::shared_ptr<> or std::unique_ptr<>, but it's very easy to screw up usage of std::auto_ptr<>. –  ildjarn Feb 21 '12 at 17:31
    
Treating an auto_ptr as if it were a unique_ptr works for me, otherwise I try to avoid it. –  Mark Ransom Feb 21 '12 at 17:31
    
This aspect of auto_ptr is generally considered a positive aspect, and is a major motivation for using auto_ptr. It has been carried over to unique_ptr. The reason auto_ptr was deprecated was simply that it was too complicated, and over specified; for the normal user, unique_ptr replaces it in all aspects. –  James Kanze Feb 21 '12 at 17:37
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@James : You can move it to another object, but those semantics are obvious since they're usually explicit (i.e. you see a std::move()). –  ildjarn Feb 21 '12 at 18:14

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