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Theoretical case. The function init () may not always be called on the page. What I want to know is if there is a difference from a speed/efficiency point of view between the two scripts? Will the fact that Class is a singleton make a difference to loading speed/amount of processing?

Script 1:

// Class is a singleton.
var Class =
{
    myFunctionOne : function ()
    {
    }

    myFunctionTwo: function ()
    {
    }
}

function init ()
{
    //Do some fancy stuff

    Class.myFunctionOne();
    Class.myFunctionTwo();
}

Script 2:

function Class ()
{
    this.myFunctionOne = function ()
    {
    }

    this.myFunctionTwo = function ()
    {
    }
}

function init ()
{
    var myClass = new Class();

    //Do some fancy stuff

    myClass.myFunctionOne();
    myClass.myFunctionTwo();
}
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closed as off-topic by James Montagne, squint, ThinkingStiff, bfavaretto, Lego Stormtroopr Mar 3 '14 at 3:37

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined in the help center." – James Montagne, squint, ThinkingStiff
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
You could test it at jsperf –  James Montagne Feb 21 '12 at 17:28
2  
I think this should be posted at Code Review: codereview.stackexchange.com –  Fabian Feb 21 '12 at 17:29
    
Like most other performance questions... it likely depends on the implementation. Test it if you're curious. –  squint Feb 21 '12 at 17:35
    
the difference in performance is probably not important enough. –  Sam I am Feb 21 '12 at 22:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I would say yes, your second script has a performance advantage when init() is not being called on the page. Here's why.

In your first example, the object literal will be parsed each time the page is loaded:

var Class =
{
    myFunctionOne : function () { ... }
}

The Class object will be built, each key set to a function object. This overhead will be incurred regardless of whether these "methods" are ever actually called (though, it's possible certain JavaScript compilers may implement optimizations here such as "Just-In-Time compiling", so the actual perf gain may vary browser to browser)

In your second example:

function Class ()
{
    this.myFunctionOne = function () { ... }
}

The myFunctionOne line is being run each time Class is being called, in your case through the new operator. This cost will be incurred each time Class is instantiated rather than once per page load. However you've stated this class is using a singleton pattern so you'll only have one instance anyway.

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If you are worried about initial page load/processing time, why even have the code on the page. Load the JavaScript dynamically.

function init() {
    if(!document.getElementById("SingletonClass")) {
        var dynScript = document.createElement('script');
        dynScript.id = "SingletonClass";
        dynScript.type = "text/javascript";
        dynScript.src = "SingletonClass.js";
        document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0].appendChild(dynScript);
    }
}

Or simply use the jQuery getScript function. http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.getScript/

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