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Is there a reasonably fast way to extract the exponent and mantissa from a Number in Javascript?

AFAIK there's no way to get at the bits behind a Number in Javascript, which makes it seem to me that I'm looking at a factorization problem: finding m and n such that 2^n * m = k for a given k. Since integer factorization is in NP, I can only assume that this would be a fairly hard problem.

I'm implementing a GHC plugin for generating Javascript and need to implement the decodeFloat_Int# and decodeDouble_2Int# primitive operations; I guess I could just rewrite the parts of the base library that uses the operation to do wahtever they're doing in some other way (which shouldn't be too hard since all numeric types have Number as their representation anyway,) but it'd be nice if I didn't have to.

Is there any way to do this in an even remotely performant way, by some dark Javascript voodoo, clever mathematics or some other means, or should I just buckle down and have at the base library?

EDIT Based on ruakh's and Louis Wasserman's excellent answers, I came up with the following implementation, which seems to work well enough:

function getNumberParts(x) {
    if(isNaN(x)) {
        return {mantissa: -6755399441055744, exponent: 972};
    }
    var sig = x > 0 ? 1 : -1;
    if(!isFinite(x)) {
        return {mantissa: sig * 4503599627370496, exponent: 972};
    }
    x = Math.abs(x);
    var exp = Math.floor(Math.log(x)*Math.LOG2E)-52;
    var man = x/Math.pow(2, exp);
    return {mantissa: sig*man, exponent: exp};
}
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2  
Your solution seems risky to me. In particular, I'm very suspicious of small rounding errors in Math.log(x) * Math.LOG2E giving you something like 5.99999996 and the floor truncating that down to 5. Go ahead and do the logarithm yourself; it'll be much less prone to rounding errors. –  Louis Wasserman Feb 21 '12 at 20:59
    
@LouisWasserman: that is a very good point; I'll better do that. Thanks! –  valderman Feb 21 '12 at 21:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

ECMAScript doesn't define any straightforward way to do this; but for what it's worth, this isn't a "factorization problem" in the same sense as prime factorization.

What you want can theoretically be done very quickly by first handling the sign, then using a binary-tree approach (or logarithm) to find the exponent, and lastly dividing by the relevant power of two to get the mantissa; but unfortunately, it can be somewhat tricky to implement this in practice (what with special cases such as denormalized numbers). I recommend you read through section 8.5 of the ECMAScript specification to get a sense of what cases you'll have to handle.

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1  
Factorization is unquestionably in NP, it's just not believed to be NP-hard. You have them mixed up. –  Louis Wasserman Feb 21 '12 at 19:37
    
@LouisWasserman: Hmm, I'm finding conflicting information online. I'll just remove that portion of my answer, since it's not really important. Thanks. –  ruakh Feb 21 '12 at 19:46
    
Thank you; however, won't this method (at least if the base 2 logarithm is used to obtain the exponent) give a non-integer mantissa for most numbers? –  valderman Feb 21 '12 at 19:56
    
@valderman: That's a good question. I'm used to thinking of the mantissa as a value in the range [1.0, 2.0) and the exponent as an integer in the range [-1022, +1023], but EMCAScript presents numbers in terms of an integer in the range [2^52, 2^53) and an integer in the range [-1074, +971] (and therefore avoids the terms "mantissa" and "exponent"), and Haskell seems to do the same (though it does use those terms). Even so, this is easily addressed by incorporating an offset of -52 after performing the logarithm. –  ruakh Feb 21 '12 at 20:08
1  
@ruakh: NP is, to put it simply, the class of problems whose solutions may be checked in polynomial time. Multiplication takes polynomial time, therefore factorization is in NP. –  hammar Feb 21 '12 at 20:51

Using the new ArrayBuffer access arrays, it is actually possible to retrieve the exact mantissa and exponent, by extracting them from the Uint8Array. If you need more speed, consider reusing the Float64Array.

function getNumberParts(x)
{
    var float = new Float64Array(1),
        bytes = new Uint8Array(float.buffer);

    float[0] = x;

    var sign = bytes[7] >> 7,
        exponent = ((bytes[7] & 0x7f) << 4 | bytes[6] >> 4) - 0x3ff;

    bytes[7] = 0x3f;
    bytes[6] |= 0xf0;

    return {
        sign: sign,
        exponent: exponent,
        mantissa: float[0],
    }
}

I've also created some test cases. 0 fails, since there is another representation for 2^-1023.

var tests = [1, -1, .123, -.123, 1.5, -1.5, 1e100, -1e100, 
                    1e-100, -1e-100, Infinity, -Infinity];

tests.forEach(function(x)
{
    var parts = getNumberParts(x),
        value = Math.pow(-1, parts.sign) *
                    Math.pow(2, parts.exponent) *
                    parts.mantissa;

    console.log("Testing: " + x + " " + value);
    console.assert(x === value);
});

console.log("Tests passed");
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good code, works 100% as Math.getExponent in Java –  4esn0k Jul 18 '13 at 9:04
    
this solution will work event on iPad, where denormalized numbers are not supported –  4esn0k Jul 19 '13 at 11:41
    
Test it here: jsfiddle.net/jfvkzvsu/2 –  Jonas Berlin Dec 4 '14 at 22:13

Integer factorization is nowhere near necessary for this.

The exponent is basically going to be the floor of the base-2 logarithm, which isn't that hard to compute.

The following code passes QuickCheck tests, as well as tests on infinity and negative infinity:

minNormalizedDouble :: Double
minNormalizedDouble = 2 ^^ (-1022)

powers :: [(Int, Double)]
powers = [(b, 2.0 ^^ fromIntegral b) | i <- [9, 8..0], let b = bit i]

exponentOf :: Double -> Int
exponentOf d
  | d < 0   = exponentOf (-d)
  | d < minNormalizedDouble = -1024
  | d < 1   = 
      let go (dd, accum) (p, twoP)
            | dd * twoP < 1 = (dd * twoP, accum - p)
            | otherwise = (dd, accum)
      in snd $ foldl' go (d, 0) powers
  | otherwise   =
      let go (x, accum) (p, twoP)
            | x * twoP <= d = (x * twoP, accum + p)
            | otherwise = (x, accum)
    in 1 + (snd $ foldl' go (1.0, 0) powers)


decode :: Double -> (Integer, Int)
decode 0.0 = (0, 0)
decode d
  | isInfinite d, d > 0 = (4503599627370496, 972)
  | isInfinite d, d < 0 = (-4503599627370496, 972)
  | isNaN d             = (-6755399441055744, 972)
  | otherwise       =
      let
        e = exponentOf d - 53
        twoE = 2.0 ^^ e
         in (round (d / twoE), e)

I tested it using quickCheck (\ d -> decodeFloat d == decode d), and explicitly tested it separately on positive and negative infinities.

The only primitive operations used here are left-shift, double multiplication, double division, and infinity and NaN testing, which Javascript supports to the best of my knowledge.

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+1: Nicely done! –  ruakh Feb 21 '12 at 20:18
    
Yep. I would've had it up sooner if Haskell's decodeFloat operation wasn't so far from what I'd expected! I've been doing a lot of IEEE754 hackery in Java lately, though, which helped. –  Louis Wasserman Feb 21 '12 at 20:20
    
Your minNormalizedDouble is actually denormalized, the smallest positive normalized Double is 0.5 ^ 1022. Due to a ^^ b = 1/(a ^ (-b)) for b < 0, the exponentiation overflows for 0 < d < minNormalizedDouble, giving nonsense results (you're rounding Infinity). let e = exponentOf d - 53; twoE | e < 0 = 0.5 ^ (-e) | otherwise = 2 ^ e fixes that. In what way is decodeFloat far from what you expected? –  Daniel Fischer Feb 21 '12 at 21:01
    
Fixed. I guess I feel like I expect Int64 to get involved rather than Integer; in particular, I'd like a way to get the bits of the double directly in an Int64. –  Louis Wasserman Feb 21 '12 at 21:18

My Haskell is non-existent. Here's a solution in JavaScript. As others have noted, the key is to calculate the binary logarithm to get the exponent.

From http://blog.coolmuse.com/2012/06/21/getting-the-exponent-and-mantissa-from-a-javascript-number/

function decodeIEEE64 ( value ) { if ( typeof value !== "number" ) throw new TypeError( "value must be a Number" ); var result = { isNegative : false, exponent : 0, mantissa : 0 }; if ( value === 0 ) { return result; } // not finite? if ( !isFinite( value ) ) { result.exponent = 2047; if ( isNaN( value ) ) { result.isNegative = false; result.mantissa = 2251799813685248; // QNan } else { result.isNegative = value === -Infinity; result.mantissa = 0; } return result; } // negative? if ( value < 0 ) { result.isNegative = true; value = -value; } // calculate biased exponent var e = 0; if ( value >= Math.pow( 2, -1022 ) ) { // not denormalized // calculate integer part of binary logarithm var r = value; while ( r < 1 ) { e -= 1; r *= 2; } while ( r >= 2 ) { e += 1; r /= 2; } e += 1023; // add bias } result.exponent = e; // calculate mantissa if ( e != 0 ) { var f = value / Math.pow( 2, e - 1023 ); result.mantissa = Math.floor( (f - 1) * Math.pow( 2, 52 ) ); } else { // denormalized result.mantissa = Math.floor( value / Math.pow( 2, -1074 ) ); } return result; }
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