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I'm curious to learn Vim and use it as an IDE because other editor are heavy a little. What is the best combination of plugins for Vim to use it as a PHP, jQuery, HTML and CSS IDE?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Daniel Mann, John Kraft, ryan1234, Yotam Omer, madth3 Jul 30 '13 at 0:58

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

7 Answers 7

I love vim, but I would never use it as full IDE replacement. Use Netbeans + excelent jvi plugin.

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Check out this one:

https://github.com/renownedmedia/Vim-PHP-IDE

And this one:

https://github.com/spf13/spf13-vim

But the rule of thumb is:

Start minimal (default configuration), and add as you think fit. This way you will learn the vim internals better. And take ideas from other .vimrc files.

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IDE's are nice if you have some big framework that does a bunch of things, and completes your code and all that jazz. IDE's are unnecessary about half the time because you're just editing text-based files, and most of their functionality can be replicated with VIm plugins.

Almost every server ever has VIm built-in, so it's nice to know it, that way you can do everything from the CLI and be uber-nerdy. instead of setting up plugins on every server I use VIm without plugins, my .vimrc is minimal here it is:

set nocompatible
set backspace=indent,eol,start
syntax on
filetype plugin indent on
colorscheme solarized
if has('gui_running')
        set background=light
else
        set background=dark
endif
let html_use_css=1

set tabstop =4
set shiftwidth=4
set expandtab
set number

set autoindent
set nowrap
set backupdir=~/.tmp
set directory=~/.tmp " Don't clutter dirs with tmp & swp
command! Q q "Bind :Q to :q

the colorscheme bit relies on the Solarized theme by ethan schoonover everything else sets up tabs and line numbers and all those goodies, to learn more in VIm just use :help number or replace number with whatever your looking for.

Check out vimbits for some neat .vimrc tricks...

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vim has syntax highlighting for all major scripting languages, so the default will be sufficient, vim will always remain my favorite text/scripts editor, yet, you will always get the job done quicker using an IDE.

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1  
You can almost certainly never get the job done quicker using an IDE unless you're not that familiar/comfortable with vim. :-) –  drrcknlsn Feb 21 '12 at 20:07

I have found the below article to be a great resource in learning how to use vim as an IDE. While written in the context of python development, much of the functionality could be used for other languages e.g. code completion, folding, code navigation, etc.

http://sontek.net/turning-vim-into-a-modern-python-ide

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I'm curious to learn Vim and use it as an IDE because other editor are heavy a little. What is the best combination of plugins for Vim to use it as a PHP, jQuery, HTML and CSS IDE?

You can't reasonably expect Vim to become a full blown IDE. It's a very powerful editor but the level of integration (the I in IDE) one could expect from Eclipse or NetBeans or whatever IDE can't be achieved with Vim.

That said, many coders use it daily and get their job done. Some use "distributions" like the ones cited in other answers or Janus while other prefer to pick and choose their plugins carefully and populate their ~/.vimrc themselves, thanks.

Here are a few plugins I find useful:

  • CtrlP for fast and intuitive buffer/file navigation
  • SnipMate for TextMate-like tab-expansion
  • Surround for manipulating pairs of characters
  • Syntastic for syntax validation of many filetypes
  • TagBar/TagList for code navigation
  • Commentary for (un)commenting your code

Vim has built-in support for tags and also omni-completion.

Good luck.

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Cool plugins. Thanks. –  Arash M Feb 26 '12 at 18:38

For web development, zen coding plugin is very useful too.

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