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I'm currently using a library that uses code like

T& being_a_bad_boy()
{
    return *reinterpret_cast<T*>(0);
}

to make a reference to a T without there actually being a T. This is undefined behavior, specifically noted to be unsupported by the standard, but it's not an unheard of pattern.

I am curious if there are any examples or platforms or usages that show that in practice this can cause problems. Can anyone provide some?

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1  
@Ell: It can. –  Xeo Feb 21 '12 at 19:18
2  
@Ell, No, it is undefined behavior. In practice, on most (all?) platforms, you won't actually crash anything until you try to use the dereferenced NULL. –  Mike Graham Feb 21 '12 at 19:19
1  
I'd be really curious to find out an answer, too, but my obvious follow-up question to you would be "why?" Is it just curiosity, or do you have a practical reason? –  dasblinkenlight Feb 21 '12 at 19:22
4  
I find your "This pattern is in wide use in the wild." comment disturbing. If that really is your perception, I recommend you find a different "wild" to work in -- if for no other reason, just because you can't ever be sure if 'T a = <lvalue-ref>;' is going to crash... –  mcmcc Feb 24 '12 at 3:39
2  
@mcmcc, Your commitment to sane practices is well-taken, but your assessment of the the C++ ecosystem strikes me as optimistic (or flat out naïve). –  Mike Graham Mar 7 '12 at 22:19

6 Answers 6

Classically, compilers treated "undefined behavior" as simply an excuse not to check for various types of errors and merely "let it happen anyway." But contemporary compilers are starting to use undefined behavior to guide optimizations.

Consider this code:

int table[5];
bool does_table_contain(int v)
{
    for (int i = 0; i <= 5; i++) {
        if (table[i] == v) return true;
    }
    return false;
}

Classical compilers wouldn't notice that your loop limit was written incorrectly and that the last iteration reads off the end of the array. It would just try to read off the end of the array anyway, and return true if the value one past the end of the array happened to match.

A post-classical compiler on the other hand might perform the following analysis:

  • The first five times through the loop, the function might return true.
  • When i = 5, the code performs undefined behavior. Therefore, the case i = 5 can be treated as unreachable.
  • The case i = 6 (loop runs to completion) is also unreachable, because in order to get there, you first have to do i = 5, which we have already shown was unreachable.
  • Therefore, all reachable code paths return true.

The compiler would then simplify this function to

bool does_table_contain(int v)
{
    return true;
}

Another way of looking at this optimization is that the compiler mentally unrolled the loop:

bool does_table_contain(int v)
{
    if (table[0] == v) return true;
    if (table[1] == v) return true;
    if (table[2] == v) return true;
    if (table[3] == v) return true;
    if (table[4] == v) return true;
    if (table[5] == v) return true;
    return false;
}

And then it realized that the evaluation of table[5] is undefined, so everything past that point is unreachable:

bool does_table_contain(int v)
{
    if (table[0] == v) return true;
    if (table[1] == v) return true;
    if (table[2] == v) return true;
    if (table[3] == v) return true;
    if (table[4] == v) return true;
    /* unreachable due to undefined behavior */
}

and then observe that all reachable code paths return true.

A compiler which uses undefined behavior to guide optimizations would see that every code path through the being_a_bad_boy function invokes undefined behavior, and therefore the being_a_bad_boy function can be reduced to

T& being_a_bad_boy()
{
    /* unreachable due to undefined behavior */
}

This analysis can then back-propagate into all callers of being_a_bad_boy:

void playing_with_fire(bool match_lit, T& t)
{
    kindle(match_lit ? being_a_bad_boy() : t);
} 

Since we know that being_a_bad_boy is unreachable due to undefined behavior, the compiler can conclude that match_lit must never be true, resulting in

void playing_with_fire(bool match_lit, T& t)
{
    kindle(t);
} 

And now everything is catching fire regardless of whether the match is lit.

You may not see this type of undefined-behavior-guided optimization in current-generation compilers much, but like hardware acceleration in Web browsers, it's only a matter of time before it starts becoming more mainstream.

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Generally, if compilers detect undefined behavior, right now they at least issue a warning about it. I doubt they'll intentionally hide this from the user. –  bdow Feb 28 '12 at 15:55
8  
@bdow Check out part 3 of the series I linked to, specifically the part titled "Why can't you warn when optimizing based on undefined behavior?" –  Raymond Chen Feb 28 '12 at 17:00
    
You're right; because the compiler performs optimizations on code that may have been mangled by previous optimizations, it can't just throw up its arms there. What I was trying to say is that hopefully the compiler will detect and flag undefined behavior in code -as originally written-. Maybe compilers aren't as good at that as I thought. –  bdow Feb 28 '12 at 22:20
1  
@bdow this is old, but a big problem is that C and C++ programmers are very accustomed to writing code that has undefined behavior but is dynamically unreachable (which is perfectly legal), especially in macros, templates, etc...a compiler can't reliably filter out those warnings without solving the halting problem –  Stephen Lin Mar 17 '13 at 19:22

The largest problem with this code isn't that it's likely to break - it's that it defies an implicit assumption programmers have about references that they will always be valid. This is just asking for trouble when someone unfamiliar with the "convention" runs into this code.

There's a potential technical glitch too. Since references are only allowed to refer to valid variables without undefined behavior, and no variable has the address NULL, an optimizing compiler is allowed to optimize out any checks for nullness. I haven't actually seen this done but it is possible.

T &bad = being_a_bad_boy();
if (&bad == NULL)  // this could be optimized away!

Edit: I'm going to shamelessly steal from a comment by @mcmcc and point out that this common idiom is likely to crash because it's using an invalid reference. According to Murphy's Law it will be at the worst possible moment, and of course never during testing.

T bad2 = being_a_bad_boy();

I also know from personal experience that the effects of an invalid reference can propagate far from where the reference was generated, making debugging pure hell.

T &bad3 = being_a_bad_boy();
bad3.do_something();

T::do_something()
{
    use_a_member_of_T();
}

T::use_a_member_of_T()
{
    member = get_unrelated_value(); // crash occurs here, leaving you wondering what happened in get_unrelated_value
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm going to camp on with Mark. There's nothing technically 'wrong' with the code. The reference is an 'alias' to the NULL. There is no dereference, there is no problem. However this practice invariably leads to code like this: 'if (&refVariable == NULL )'. At this point one has to ask 'man, I thought references were supposed to get me away from all this pointer checking!'. –  Joe Mar 4 '12 at 23:52
    
@Joe, especially when you consider that the pointer check is guaranteed to work while the reference check might not! –  Mark Ransom Mar 5 '12 at 3:01
    
"... implicit assumption programmers have about references that they will always be valid." I hope I'm not playing language lawyer (I'm not qualified), but a reference cannot be NULL, which it appears to be in this case. That surely violates the semantics of a reference. I don't see how a NULL reference can be valid. –  jww May 21 '13 at 5:26
    
@noloader, you're right - a valid reference can't be NULL. But an invalid one can. And my point was that both programmers and the compiler should be able to assume they'll never see an invalid reference, or very bad things can happen. –  Mark Ransom May 21 '13 at 5:41

I would expect that on most platforms, the compiler will convert all references into pointers. If that assumption is true, then this will be identical to just passing around a NULL pointer, which is fine as long as you never use it. The question, then is whether there are any compilers that handle references in some way other than just converting them to pointers. I don't know of any such compilers, but I suppose it's possible that they exist.

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1  
Your first sentence is correct, but the remainder of your comment doesn't really follow from it. Consider something like for(int i = 0; i >= 0; ++i). On most platforms, overflow of ++i will cause i to become negative, exiting the loop -- except that an optimizing compiler might notice that i is strictly increasing, and remove the unnecessary test for i >= 0. (Optimizing compilers really do notice this sort of thing, and really do make these sorts of optimizations that depend on programs' not invoking undefined behavior.) Similarly with references: a valid program with [continued] –  ruakh Feb 22 '12 at 0:18
    
[continued] references might be converted into an equivalent program with pointers, but that doesn't mean that the same applies to invalid programs that use references to invoke undefined behavior. –  ruakh Feb 22 '12 at 0:19

The important thing to remember is that you have a contract with your users. If you're trying to return a reference to a null pointer, undefined behavior is now part if your function's interface. If your users are all prepared to accept this, then that's on them... but I would try to avoid it if at all possible.

If your code can result in an invalid object, then either have it return a pointer (preferably a smart pointer, but that's another discussion), use the null object pattern mentioned above (boost::optional may be useful here), or throw an exception.

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I don't know if this is problems enough for you, or near enough to your "use case", this crashes for me in gcc (on x86_64) :

int main( )
{
    volatile int* i = 0;
    *i;
}

That said, we should keep in mind that it is always UB, and compilers might change their mind later, so that today it works, tomorrow not.

Another not so obvious bad thing will happen when you call a virtual function on a null pointer (due to usually being implemented via vptr to vtable), and as such of course this applies to the (in standard C++ not existing) null reference.

Btw. I even heard that architectures exist, where even copying around a non-null pointer to invalid memory will trap, maybe there exists also some out there which makes a distinction between pointer and reference.

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It looks like this is an example of actually using the dereferenced value, which is a different case. –  Mike Graham Mar 8 '12 at 17:24
    
@MikeGraham: whoops, that happens when you do too much things at once, I did not mean to assign the 0. –  PlasmaHH Mar 8 '12 at 19:16

Use the NullObject pattern.

class Null_T : public T
{
public:
    // implement virtual functions to do whatever
    // you'd expect in the null situation
};

T& doing_the_right_thing()
{
    static Null_T null;
    return null;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This can so often be slow and buggy. (The original illegal code is fast and buggy.) –  Mike Graham Aug 21 '13 at 12:33
    
What's slow and buggy about this? Your original code assumes T& won't be used. I don't know what the performance of creating the static variable would be on your system. What do you mean by often? Also, thanks for replying after a year and a half (c:. –  Peter Wood Aug 21 '13 at 12:57

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