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jsFiddle

I am trying to get these 4 divs to sit on the same vertical line. Why does the presence of buttons change the position of the first div?

HTML

<div class="box">
        <button>Y</button> <button>N</button>
</div>
<div class="box">
</div>
<div class="box">
</div>
<div class="box">
</div>​

CSS

.box {
    width:200px;
    height:200px;
    padding:10px;
    display:inline-block;
    border:1px solid black;
    text-align:center;
}​

RESULT

enter image description here

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Add vertical-align:bottom to the style of your divs.

The cause of your problem is the presence of any content, as it defines the baseline for the div.

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2  
And this is why I hate inline-block. "Oh, I'm inline." "Oh, I'm block." "No, INLINE!" "NO! BLOCK!" –  Ryan Kinal Feb 21 '12 at 21:15
    
lol, but when you know the quirks it can be very powerful. –  Niet the Dark Absol Feb 21 '12 at 22:38
    
It's obviously an en-bloc line. –  BoltClock Feb 22 '12 at 17:12
    
Yes, yes, inline-block means "inline from the outside, block from the inside". From the CSS 2.1 spec: "This value causes an element to generate an inline-level block container. The inside of an inline-block is formatted as a block box, and the element itself is formatted as an atomic inline-level box." It still annoys me. –  Ryan Kinal Feb 22 '12 at 19:40

Adjusting the css like this works

.box {
    width:200px;
    height:200px;
    padding:10px;
    border:1px solid black;
    text-align:center;
}
div.box{display:inline;float:left;}
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This will prevent the OP from using further block-level elements inside, which presumably he will want to do. And it would also require clearing the float afterwards. –  Niet the Dark Absol Feb 21 '12 at 22:40
    
Actually, not quite. An inline element that has float applied to it (if I remember my specs correctly - and I do) will be displayed as if it were block. So, really, applying inline as well as float does nothing to a block-level element. –  Ryan Kinal Feb 22 '12 at 19:38

you could try position:absolute; css code.

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How is this even a solution? Unless you want all the boxes literally on top of each other (in the Z dimension) so you can only see the top one... I dunno, I'm just confused how you think this would help. –  Niet the Dark Absol Feb 21 '12 at 22:41

jsFiddle solution

Just change the display property of the div's and they'll align vertically:

display: block

Edit: @ben said he wanted the div's aligned vertically. Vote me down if you must, but it's not my fault if he didn't know the difference between horizontal and vertical.

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display:block is default, and clearly NOT what the OP wants. –  Niet the Dark Absol Feb 21 '12 at 22:39
    
True, but he said, "I am trying to get these 4 divs to sit on the same vertical line." His CSS was display:inline-block. Changing it to block produces the desired vertical alignment. –  gmeben Feb 21 '12 at 22:44
    
I do like your solution better, of course. –  gmeben Feb 21 '12 at 22:45
    
Except for the fact that the divs in your solution are no longer on the same line. Take some context from the screenshot. –  Ryan Kinal Feb 22 '12 at 19:32
    
"I am trying to get these 4 divs to sit on the same vertical line." And ignore the context of the description? Miscommunication begets miscommunication. –  gmeben Feb 22 '12 at 20:01

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