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I have an object which is shared by multiple threads, I want to lock individual member variables, without locking the entire object, so that different threads can access to different member variables at the same time. After reading some articles, I write the code using shared_mutex and getter() / setter() functions.

    class Test
    {
    public:
    **// variable, shared_mutex and getter/setter for x**
    double x;
    boost::shared_mutex x_mutex;
    double x_getter();
    void x_setter();
    **// variable, shared_mutex and getter/setter for y**
    ......
    **// variable, shared_mutex and getter/setter for z**
    ......
    };

    double Test::x_getter()
    {
      // get shared access
      boost::shared_lock lock(_access);
      return x;
    }

    void Test::x_setter()
    {
      // get exclusive access
      boost::unique_lock lock(_access);
      // do something with x;
    }

    //getter/setter functions for y and z. 
    ......

The code looks clumsy, especially when the number of member variables increases. I am wondering whether there is better solutions out there for this type of problem.

Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Since you obviously need the lock only for the short time of actually reading/writing the data, you could just encapsulate it with the controlled data into a type which you then use as member variables:

// note: you probably should add constructors as well
template<typename T> struct synchronized
{
public:
  synchronized& operator=(T const& newval)
  {
    boost::unique_lock lock(mutex);
    value = newval;
  }
  operator T() const
  {
    boost::unique_lock lock(mutex);
    return value;
  }
private:
  T value;
  boost::shared_mutex mutex;
};

class Test
{
public:
  synchronized<double> x;
  synchronized<int> y;
  synchronized<std::string> z;
};

void foo(Test& t)
{
  double read = t.x; // locked, via synchronized<double>::operator double() const
  t.x = 3.14;        // locked, via synchronized<double>::operator=
}
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Thank you, celtschk, I implemented your method and the code looks much cleaner. –  2607 Feb 22 '12 at 14:59

You are correct that this method does look quite clumsy and quickly becomes unmanageable. As such I try to model multithreaded problems by breaking data dependence. However, without further context to what you are trying to solve, I can not advise how to model the problem.

If you are already invested in such architecture and its too late to change then I'd consider this.

template<class T>
class SharedValiable
{
    private:
        T                    myT;
        boost::shared_mutex  myTMutex;

    public:
        //
        // Implement appropriate copy, assign and default 
        // to ensure proper value semantics
        //

        T getter() const
        {
            boost::shared_lock lock(_access);
            return x;
        }

        void setter()
        {
            boost::unique_lock lock(_access);
        }
}

This allows each variable to be protected as you originally intended, but makes it easier to add new or remove members from classes. Furthermore, the template can be specialized for certain type that can use atomic OS operations such as ints. e.g.:

template<int>
class SharedValiable
{
    private:
        T                    myT;

    public:
        //
        // Implement appropriate copy, assign and default 
        // to ensure proper value semantics
        //

        T getter() const
        {
            // no need to lock, updates are atomic
            return x;
        }

        void setter()
        {
            // no mutex needed we will use an atomic OS op to update
            InterlockedCompareAndExchange(myT, newVal);
        }
}
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In general, I would advise against this. What you are trying to do, generally, with a class is to ensure some sort of guarantee on the state of an object when you enter and leave a method. For instance, in a list object, you need the links to be in a consistent state, you need the count to be correct, etc. Just locking individual variables rarely allows that to happen. If you change a link without also locking the state of the count, you are lying about one or the other when it's queried by a different thread in the middle of an update. Worse, you could change two links at the same time and end up with a screwy list that won't work anymore, depending on your storage. Of course that's one example among may possible, but you should get the idea.

If you want multiple threads to be able to view the state of your object, then you want a reader/writer lock on the whole object, which would allow as many readers as you like, but not allow them to see the object mid-update.

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While I generally agree, there are reasons to have public data, which isn't threadsafe by itself, and this is better suited to be a comment. –  David Thornley Feb 21 '12 at 21:46
    
For the diatribe at the top, you may be correct. The real answer in the answer is to use a reader/writer lock. –  Joel Feb 21 '12 at 21:54

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