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Well, I need to create two questionnaires that are almost equals. The difference are that one have a question more than the other. So I created a class with only the ID (to persistence) to be the base class for both:

public class BaseQuizzClass{
    public int ID {get;set;}
} 

And then I created the classes, with almost the same names for the variables ( I thought that it could help using razor):

public class Quizz1 : BaseQuizzClass{

   [Display(Name="QuestionHere")]
   public string q1 {get;set;}

   [Display(Name="QuestionHere")]
   public string q2 {get;set;}

   ...

   [Display(Name="QuestionHere")]
   public string q9 {get;set;}
}

public class Quizz2 : BaseQuizzClass{
   [Display(Name="QuestionHere")]
   public string q1 {get;set;}

   [Display(Name="QuestionHere")]
   public string q2 {get;set;}

   ...

   [Display(Name="QuestionHere")]
   public string q9 {get;set;}

   [Display(Name="QuestionHere")]
   public string q10 {get;set;}
}

Then I created a View using the BaseQuizzClass as model, so I could pass an child class as parameter toit. But I don't know how to access the childs class attributes.

OBS.: Each question has your own text, defined in the Display annotation.

There's any way to do what I want? (I'm not pretty sure if I was clear)

share|improve this question
    
You could use custom EditorFor templates for "Quizz1" and "Quizz2" but you're going to run in to a problem on the POST if you don't use unique action names for saving them. The only thing Quizz1 and Quizz2 have in common is that they are a BaseQuizzClass and as such, a view that edits "BaseQuizzClass" could only have the ID property. Your POST action can't accept "BaseQuizzClass" because you'll lose all of the properties that don't belong to the base –  Nick Bork Feb 21 '12 at 21:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would probably switch the model up a bit:

public class QuestionClass
{
  public String Question { get; set; }

  public String Answer { get; set; }
}

public class QuizzClass
{
  public Int32 ID { get; set; }

  [UIHint("Question")]
  public IList<QuestionClass> Questions { get; set; }
}

Then create a view for the question, and instead of using the [DisplayAttribute] using the "key/value" setup of the object.

// ~/Views/_controller_/_action_.cshtml
@model QuizzClass

@using (Html.BeginForm())
{
  for (var q = 0; q < Model.Questions.Length; q++)
  {
    // ~/Views/Shared/EditorTemplates/Question.cshtml
    @Html.EditorFor(x => Model.Questions[q]);
  }
}

It just appears over-kill to have that much similarity, yet explicitly calling out each question in your "different" objects.

share|improve this answer
    
Well... I'll remap my models so. Thanks for the answer! –  igor.araujo Feb 21 '12 at 21:27

I think your architecture is faulty. Why not just have a class with a collection that holds your questions?

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Yeah... you and Brad Christie are right... Thanks for the answer! –  igor.araujo Feb 21 '12 at 21:28

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