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I want to declare an array of "jumplabels". Then I want to jump to a "jumplabel" in this array. But I have not any idea how to do this. It should look like the following code:

function()
{
    "gotolabel" s[3];
    s[0] = s0;
    s[1] = s1;
    s[2] = s2;

    s0:
    ....
    goto s[v];

    s1:
    ....
    goto s[v];

    s2:
    ....
    goto s[v];
}

Does anyone have a idea how to perform this? Sorry for my bad English! Thanks for your help!

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3  
If it is a homework I don't recommend you to go this way - your professor wouldn't like it. –  qrdl Jun 2 '09 at 8:52
2  
no it isn't, I'm seventeen and trying to write a simple, fast tokenizer. I thought about speeding it up this way. –  youllknow Jun 2 '09 at 10:37
2  
You mention in comments below that there may be 2**16 cases. Will this be the norm? If so, it changes the problem dramatically. –  John Pirie Jun 2 '09 at 12:16
4  
@youllknow: Are you sure this is what needs speeding up? Have you profiled your code? –  Greg D Jun 2 '09 at 12:59
3  
2^16 cases and you want to maintain this as a single straight block of code... You will get into trouble earlier than later when you want to modify anything. The code will be unmaintainable, and with just a couple of lines per case plus label and goto, you are talking of a 250 KLOC function. Start with code that works and then measure and optimize if needed. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 2 '09 at 13:25

10 Answers 10

up vote 34 down vote accepted

It is possible with GCC feature known as "labels as values".

void *s[3] = {&&s0, &&s1, &&s2};

if (n >= 0 && n <=2)
    goto *s[n];

s0:
...
s1:
...
s2:
...

It works only with GCC!

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thank! this is exactly what I wanted to know! –  youllknow Jun 2 '09 at 10:24
    
if this is the right answer, mark it as an answer ! –  Bluebird75 Jun 2 '09 at 12:52
3  
+1 for exposing weirdness (blech, gack, yuck!) –  Jason S Jun 2 '09 at 13:08
    
ahhhh gcc, if only you could be in Visual Studio too! –  toto Jun 2 '09 at 15:13
3  
It is possible to change what compiler visual studio calls... –  Rob K Jun 2 '09 at 15:25

goto needs a compile-time label.

From this example it seems that you are implementing some kind of state machine. Most commonly they are implemented as a switch-case construct:

while (!finished) switch (state) {
  case s0:
  /* ... */
  state = newstate;
  break;

  /* ... */
}

If you need it to be more dynamic, use an array of function pointers.

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There's no direct way to store code addresses to jump to in C. How about using switch.

#define jump(x)  do{ label=x; goto jump_target; }while(0)
int label=START;
jump_target:
switch(label)
{
    case START:
    	/* ... */
    case LABEL_A:
    	/* ... */
}

You can find similar code produced by every stack-less parser / state machine generator. Such code is not easy to follow so unless it is generated code or your problem is most easily described by state machine I would recommend not do this.

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I think you want to drop the goto in front of the label jump_target –  Christoph Jun 2 '09 at 11:57
    
right, fixed now –  lispmachine Jun 2 '09 at 12:33

could you use function pointers instead of goto?

That way you can create an array of functions to call and call the appropriate one.

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I know that it can me made with function pointers. But this would be slow, because I would have to call a function to often. I think the call-overhead would be to big! –  youllknow Jun 2 '09 at 10:29
7  
@youllknow: The words "I think" in the above comment tell me that you're in real danger of falling for "premature optimization". The first goal should be to start with a clear "working" solution and then optimize it as necessary. Consider this: only 1 compiler has this feature as an extension, however, every C/C++ compiler uses state machines. If this is the best way to go about solving this problem, why doesn't every compiler have this feature? –  Richard Corden Jun 2 '09 at 12:40
    
@Richard Corden: So you think the speed improvment is very low? I thought about the function pointer array as well. The problem is the functions would be called very often, but they do only little things. So I thought that calling the funtion might be more expensive than what the function does. I am able to implement my problem with function pointers, but I thought that I can speed it up with the "goto-method". What's your opionion? –  youllknow Jun 2 '09 at 13:48
2  
@youllknow: A function call is very cheap: it's not much more expensive than a goto and has far fewer problems. Remember that the compiler is always better than you at optimizing. –  greyfade Jun 3 '09 at 2:53
2  
@youllknow: There is going to be a performance difference, but you need to keep in mind the trade off between "clarity" and "performance". If it were me, my first "performance" tweak would be to see can I use some combination of templates + inline functions and so allow the compiler to optimize as much as possible. BTW, this may already exist in the boost spirit library: boost.org/doc/libs/1_39_0/libs/statechart/doc/index.html. –  Richard Corden Jun 3 '09 at 7:52

In plain standard C, this not possible as far as I know. There is however an extension in the GCC compiler, documented here, that makes this possible.

The extension introduces the new operator &&, to take the address of a label, which can then be used with the goto statement.

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Interesting, didn't know that. Thanks. –  Anders Hansson Jun 2 '09 at 8:48
    
yes, very nice!, thanks! –  youllknow Jun 2 '09 at 10:38

That's what switch statements are for.

switch (var)
{
case 0:
    /* ... */
    break;
case 1:
    /* ... */
    break;
default:
    /* ... */
    break;  /* not necessary here */
}

Note that it's not necessarily translated into a jump table by the compiler.

If you really want to build the jump table yourself, you could use a function pointers array.

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It was only an simple example... In my option switch is to slow if I have 2^16 cases? Isn't it? –  youllknow Jun 2 '09 at 10:27
3  
@youllknow: often good compilers will optimize a dense switch into a jump table for you. So no, switches aren't necessarily slow. –  user83255 Jun 7 '09 at 12:28

For a simple answer, instead of forcing compilers to do real stupid stuff, learn good programming practices.

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7  
Without knowing the context how can you judge this as "real stupid stuff"? Blindly following rules (such as "goto is evil") is good for beginners. Experienced programmers know where to make an exception. –  lispmachine Jun 2 '09 at 9:02
1  
After consideration it's unlikely that experienced programmer would ask such question but this is impolite to prejudge. –  lispmachine Jun 2 '09 at 9:08
2  
it is used for a tokenizer –  youllknow Jun 2 '09 at 10:25

You can't do it with a goto - the labels have to be identifiers, not variables or constants. I can't see why you would not want to use a switch here - it will likely be just as efficient, if that is what is concerning you.

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Yes, it's all about speed! Is it even likely just as fast if there are 2^16 cases? –  youllknow Jun 2 '09 at 10:30
3  
@youllknow: a switch should be as fast as a computed goto, as the compiler should create a jump table as well –  Christoph Jun 2 '09 at 11:53
    
If youllknow really wants to have 65K jump targets I wouldn't be surprised if most compilers would fall over trying to compile a switch with that many cases. –  Michael Burr Jun 3 '09 at 6:01

You might want to look at setjmp/longjmp.

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Tokenizer? This looks like what gperf was made for. No really, take a look at it.

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