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When using the new function declarator syntax and decltype, how does one access members? It appears that this is not accessible:

template <typename Func>
struct context_binder
{
public:
    context_binder(const Func& func) :
            func(func)
    { }

    template <typename... TArgs>
    auto operator ()(TArgs&&... args) const
            -> decltype(this->func(std::forward<TArgs>(args)...))
    {
        return func(std::forward<TArgs>(args)...);
    }
private:
    Func func;
};

This yields the compiler error:

scratch.cpp:34:25: error: invalid use of ‘this’ at top level

My compiler is g++ 4.6.2.


My workaround is to declare a static member called self with the same type as the class, which has two problems:

  1. It will not pick up the CV-qualifiers automatically, like this would.
  2. I have to move the member declarations above the decltype usage or it can't see the member (although that seems more like a compiler bug).
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Upgrade to GCC 4.7. Version 4.6 doesn't support this where you're trying to use it.

Another question covers some workarounds you might be able to use.

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1  
I'm glad...this was making me question my already shaky confidence in my ability to read the standards document. –  Travis Gockel Feb 21 '12 at 21:50
    
@TravisGockel: In general, you should assume that if your reading of the standard document conflicts with GCC (or any compiler at this point), it's more likely to be the compiler than your reading comprehension. –  Nicol Bolas Feb 21 '12 at 21:58

You have two errors. The one error is what you spotted yourself. The other error is that you try to access the member before it is declared. Declare it before you use it (notice that the return type, even if it is specified in a trailing manner, cannot access members you declare later, unlike the function body).

template <typename Func>
struct context_binder
{
private:
    Func func;

public:
    context_binder(const Func& func) :
            func(func)
    { }

    template <typename... TArgs>
    auto operator ()(TArgs&&... args) const
            -> decltype(this->func(std::forward<TArgs>(args)...))
    {
        return func(std::forward<TArgs>(args)...);
    }
};

So the 2) that you term as a drawback of your workaround is not actually a drawback because the real way to code this still needs the member to be declare before you use it.

share|improve this answer
    
Very good point. It turns out dropping this-> and just using func works if I move the declaration of func higher. –  Travis Gockel Feb 21 '12 at 22:56
    
@Travis i don't think it "works" the way you want because the "const" is not respected that way (prior to the change in the working paper that "this" is allowed and is implicitly used even if not used explicitly). That "this" was disallowed has nothing to do with the ability to refer to non-static data members in a "decltype". For example you can say from "main": "decltype(context_binder::func())", if "func" were "public" and would accept a call with zero arguments. In that use, "context_binder::func" has type "Func", not "Func const". –  Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 21 '12 at 23:24

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