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I have a bunch of divs which I nest arbitrarily:

<div>
  <div>
    <div>Apple</div>
    <div>
      <div>Banana</div>
      <div>Grape</div>
    </div>
  </div>
  <div>Craisin</div>
</div>

I make their contents pink with a rule like this:

div { color: pink; }

I want to be able to add the special class to any of those divs to cancel out the pink rule for it and all of its children. For example, if I add the special class to this div,

<div>
  <div class="special">
    <div>Apple</div>
    <div>
      <div>Banana</div>
      <div>Grape</div>
    </div>
  </div>
  <div>Craisin</div>
</div>

then "Apple," "Banana," and "Grape" should no longer be pink.

Can I tweak my rule to only match divs that aren't nested inside a .special?

I'm not looking for a solution involves writing a rule for .special that cancels out every style defined on div. For example, this is not a good solution even though it works:

.special, .special div { color: black !important; }

My actual styles are more complicated than just changing the color, and there are other rules with selectors like div span which I would also like to disable with the special class.

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You cannot prevent children/descendants from inheriting inheritable style properties using CSS.

The style properties for the descendants have to explictly be reset.

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So there's no way to write something like .div:noparents(.special)? –  alltom Feb 22 '12 at 3:15
    
@alltom You cannot select a children, then the parents. "Parent selectors" do not exist in CSS. The only way to achieve such is: div{color:red;}div.special, .special div {color:black;} (assuming that black is the default color). –  Rob W Feb 22 '12 at 9:04
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