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Good people of stackoverflow,

As always, I am writing a factory in order to dynamically instantiate objects.

To schematize, I have four types:

class CatDescriptor : PetDescriptor
class DogDescriptor : PetDescriptor

class Cat : Pet
class Dog : Pet

I instanciate the two last types from the factory. And here comes the dilemma: Should I just test the descriptor types with the "is" operator which hides reflection and then cost something.

static Pet.Factory(PetDescriptor descriptor)
{
    if (descriptor is CatDescriptor)
    {
        return new Cat();
    }
    else if (...)
    {
        ...
    }
}

Should I use an Enum "Type" as an attribute embedded in the PetDescriptor.

class PetDescriptor
{
    public Type PetType;

    public enum Type
    {
        Cat,
        Dog
    }
}

static Pet.Factory(PetDescriptor descriptor)
{
    switch (descriptor.PetType)
    {
        case PetDescriptor.Type.Cat:
            return new Cat();
        ....
    }
}

Or use virtual methods:

class PetDescriptor
{
    public virtual bool IsCat()
    {
        return false;
    }

    ...
}

class CatDescriptor : PetDescriptor
{
    public override bool IsCat()
    {
        return true;
    }
}

static Pet.Factory(PetDescriptor descriptor)
{
    if (descriptor.IsCat())
    {
        return new Cat();
    }
    else if (...)
    {
        ...
    }
}

Votes are opened !

edit: question is about reflection performance, and not factory design.

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1  
May I suggest that you edit the question into something more useful than "Object Factory:". –  Daniel Daranas Jun 2 '09 at 10:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since your PetDescriptor identifies the Pet I would use overload:

static class PetFactory
{
    public static Dog CreatePet(DogDescriptor descriptor)
    {
        return new Dog(descriptor);
    }

    public static Cat CreatePet(CatDescriptor descriptor)
    {
        return new Cat(descriptor);
    }
}

(edit)

Of course, this only works if you have a concrete PetDescritor : CatDescriptor or DogDescriptor.

If you don't have the abstract PetDescriptor upon creation I would go with the first solution.

Alternately, you could declare an Enum in the Factory class that would specify with concrete Pet you like to create. The Wikipedia has a simple example with Pizza.

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Having tests in your factory defeat the purpose (you'll have to update your class for every new concrete instance you want to create).

You can either :

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I think you have the wrong end of the stick he's not unit testing he's creating a Pet from a pet descriptor. and The factory Uses the Pet descriptor to decide which pet to create. At least thats my understanding. –  Omar Kooheji Jun 2 '09 at 9:33
    
We're not talking about Unit Testing here, but factories. IoC and abstract factories are not (only) about testing. They're about loosely coupled and maintenable design. –  Yann Schwartz Jun 2 '09 at 9:35
    
Hi yann, I don't see the added value of such a pattern here... Could you please make a quick implementation with my example to convince me ? Thx. –  Roubachof Jun 2 '09 at 15:04

Your third solution (with virtual method) is definitely out : the PetDescriptor class should not know about all it's derived classes (you would have to add a new method IsXXX every time you create a XXXDescriptor class).

I think your first solution is the best. The enum doesn't add anything useful, it just forces you to add more code in descriptor classes

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You don't want to have a single factory class you want to have factoriy classes for each Tyep of pet.

They should all implement a Pet factory interface.

The way you have it every time you add a new pet you will have to edit the Pet factory, rather than just creating a new pet factory class and using that.

Alternatively each pet class could be responsible for creating instances of itself (or the pet descriptor whcih is linked to a pet. Have a look at the Factory method pattern:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Factory_method_pattern

http://www.dofactory.com/Patterns/PatternFactory.aspx

At least thats my understanding.

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My English is terrible, so i hope i understand your question correctly.

How many pets-type have u got?

if You got 2 pets, and u are sure thats it count will not increasing in future - do not use any factory(dont be fanatic)

if there something about 10 pets - i think u need something like an abstract factory. In this case - each descriptor can create his own pet, So if u got any descriptor, u can create some pet without any aditional information:

 //of course u can use your own base class instead of interface. 
interface IPetDescriptor
{
   //here u can place some additional type information, if u need. Tags or genetic code, or maybe some story about this type
    Pet CreatePet();//Maybe u need some aditional createInformation?

}

class DogDescriptor:IPetDescriptor
{
   public Pet CreatePet(){ return new Dog();}
}
class CatDescriptor:IPetDescriptor
{
   public Pet CreatePet(){ return new Cat();}
}

 class Pet
 {
    public Pet static Pet.Factory(IPetDescriptor descriptor)
    {
       //Place for additional initialization, if u need...


       //we don't care about pet type. Thats good.
       return descriptor.CreatePet(); 
     }
     .... 
 }

if there are 100 pet-types, much better solution is using IoC-framework, or write your own (for example, u can create type auto-searcher):

C# Auto-scaning factory

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