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I'm using Entity Framework 4.3.1 Code-First and I need to split an entity between two tables. The tables have a primary key shared, and it is 1-to-1, but the columns are not named the same on each table.

I don't control the data layout, nor can I request any changes.

So for example, the SQL tables could be

SQL data tables

And this would be my entity...

public class MyEntity
{
    public int Id {get; set;}
    public string Name {get;set}
    public string FromAnotherTable {get;set;}
}

And here is the mapping I have.

public class MyEntityMapping : EntityTypeConfiguration<MyEntity>
{
    public MyEntityMapping()
    {
        this.Property(e => e.Id).HasColumnName("ThePrimaryKeyId");
        this.Property(e => e.Name).HasColumnName("MyDatabaseName");
        this.Property(e => e.FromAnothertable).HasColumnName("AnotherTableColumn");
        this.Map(m =>
            {
                m.Properties(e =>
                     {
                         e.Id,
                         e.Name
                     });
                m.ToTable("MainTable");
            });
        this.Map(m =>
            {
                m.Properties(e =>
                     {
                         e.Id,
                         e.FromAnotherTable
                     });
                m.ToTable("ExtendedTable");
            });
}

Since the key shared between them has a different column name, I'm not sure how to map it. This mapping will compile, but fails at runtime because EF emits SQL looking for the "ThePrimaryKeyId" column on the "ExtendedTable" table, which doesn't exist.

EDIT To clarify, what I have defined above can (and does) work if the PK on the "ExtendedTable" followed naming conventions. But it doesn't and I can't change the schema.

Basically, what I need EF to emit is a SQL statement like

SELECT
    [e1].*,   /*yes, wildcards are bad. doing it here for brevity*/
    [e2].*
FROM [MainTable] AS [e1]
INNER JOIN [ExtendedTable] AS [e2]  /*Could be left join, don't care. */
    ON  [e1].[ThePrimaryKeyId] = [e2].[NotTheSameName]

But the only thing it seems to want to emit is

 SELECT
        [e1].*,
        [e2].*
    FROM [MainTable] AS [e1]
    INNER JOIN [ExtendedTable] AS [e2]
        ON  [e1].[ThePrimaryKeyId] = [e2].[ThePrimaryKeyId] /* this column doesn't exist */

Edit I tried the 1-to-1 approach again at NSGaga's suggestion. It didn't work, but here are the results. Entities

public class MyEntity
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int Name { get; set; }
    public virtual ExtEntity ExtendedProperties { get; set; }
}
public class ExtEntity
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string AnotherTableColumn { get; set; }
    public virtual MyEntity MainEntry { get; set; }
}

Here are the mapping classes

public class MyEntityMapping : EntityTypeConfiguration<MyEntity>
{
    public MyEntityMapping()
    {
        this.Property(e => e.Id).HasColumnName("ThePrimaryKeyId");
        this.Property(e => e.Name).HasColumnName("MyDatabaseName");
        this.ToTable("MainTable");
        this.HasKey(e => e.Id);
        this.HasRequired(e => e.ExtendedProperties).WithRequiredPrincipal(f => f.MainEntry);
    }
}

public class ExtEntityMapping : EntityTypeConfiguration<ExtEntity>
{
    public ExtEntityMapping()
    {
        this.Property(e => e.Id).HasColumnName("NotTheSameName");
        this.Property(e => e.AnotherTableColumn).HasColumnName("AnotherTableColumn");
        this.ToTable("ExtendedTable");
        this.HasKey(e => e.Id);
        this.HasRequired(e => e.MainEntry).WithRequiredDependent(f => f.ExtendedProperties);
    }
}

This setup gets the message

"Column or attribute 'MyEntity_ThePrimaryKeyId' is not defined in 'ExtendedTable'"

Changing the final map line to

this.HasRequired(e => e.MainEntry).WithRequiredDependent(f => f.ExtendedProperties).Map(m => M.MapKey("NotTheSameName"));

Returns this message

"Each property name in a type must be unique. property name 'NotTheSameName' was already defined."

Changing the mapped key to use the column from the parent table, MapKey("ThePrimaryKeyId"). returns this message

"Column or attribute 'ThePrimaryKeyId' is not defined in 'ExtendedTable'"

Removing the Id property from the ExtEntity class throws an error because then the entity doesn't have a defined key.

share|improve this question
    
Ah! so the "ExtendedTable" is not in the schema that you are creating; if you are just blowing away and creating a new database via a DropCreateDatabaseAlways then there is no way to map to an non-existent table; the only way would be to include this table as part of the schema or have a preset DB with the "ExtendedTable" already there and use EF 4.3 code migrations to alter the database opposed to create a new one. –  Ricky Feb 21 '12 at 23:29
    
I'm not sure I follow what you mean, but this is an existing database schema. In fact, this is mapping to a DB2 database on a mainframe. I do not want EF to try to drop or create anything. –  Josh Feb 22 '12 at 0:11
1  
Hi Josh I have the same problem and have posted it here on the EF forums here, haven't had much luck working around it. Have you heard from any of the EF team? –  TheDuke Mar 20 '12 at 10:55
    
Nope, haven't heard anything but crickets. :) –  Josh Mar 20 '12 at 15:20
1  
Are you sure you must 'split' entity in two? just asking - relating two entities (1-to-1 - required:required) together is fully customizable. The map / properties relies on anonymous types and requires a function/expression pointing to a property (and it's how it gets the name) - and it's pretty 'sensible' requirement for splitting into two tables. This 'avenue' of EF has always been a bit problematic. You could try changing the migration script to rename column name but it smells of hacking in this case, not sure if it'd work. –  NSGaga Mar 21 '12 at 22:37
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

I can't find anything that specifically states that the name of the column has to be the same in both tables; but neither can I find anything that says it doesn't, or explains how you would map that scenario. Every example I can find has the key with the same name in both tables. It looks to me like this is a hole in the DbContext design.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, that's where I'm leaning now too. –  Josh Apr 2 '12 at 19:36
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No Visual Studio here, but try this with the 1-to-1 approach:

this.HasRequired(e => e.ExtendedProperties).HasConstraint((e, m) => e.Id == m.Id);

Update:
Here are some links that might help (could not find a real reference link)

How to declare one to one relationship using Entity Framework 4 Code First (POCO)
Entity Framework 4 CTP 4 Code First: how to work with unconventional primary and foreign key names

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not finding any method like .HasConstraint(). Can you point me to the docs or some reference? Thanks! –  Josh Mar 29 '12 at 18:26
    
It looks like HasConstraint() was in the CTP but not in the release. Haven't found an equivalent. I'm using the 4.3.1 release. –  Josh Mar 29 '12 at 21:04
    
BTW, Entity Splitting would be the preferred solution to this. 1-to-1 is a less desirable alternative. I think EF doesn't like it because it wants to see the PK from each table represented on the other table, whereas this is a FK AND PK to enforce it. –  Josh Mar 29 '12 at 21:22
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And just to provide (as I promised) a 1-to-1 (two entities, two tables) mapping, for what it's worth.
Here is what works for me and should in your case...

public class MainTable
{
    public int ThePrimaryKeyId { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}
public class ExtendedTable
{
    public int NotTheSameNameID { get; set; }
    public string AnotherTableColumn { get; set; }
    public MainTable MainEntry { get; set; }
}
public class MainDbContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<MainTable> MainEntries { get; set; }
    public DbSet<ExtendedTable> ExtendedEntries { get; set; }
    protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        modelBuilder.Entity<MainTable>()
            .HasKey(x => new { x.ThePrimaryKeyId });

        modelBuilder.Entity<ExtendedTable>()
            .HasKey(x => new { x.NotTheSameNameID });

        // Extended To Main 1 on 1
        modelBuilder.Entity<ExtendedTable>()
            .HasRequired(i => i.MainEntry)
            .WithRequiredDependent();
    }
}

...and a test code something like...

using (var db = new UserDbContext())
{
    foreach (var userid in Enumerable.Range(1, 100))
    {
        var main = new MainTable { Name = "Main" + userid };
        db.MainEntries.Add(main);

        var extended = new ExtendedTable { AnotherTableColumn = "Extended" + userid, MainEntry = main };
        db.ExtendedEntries.Add(extended);
    }
    int recordsAffected = db.SaveChanges();
    foreach (var main in db.MainEntries)
        Console.WriteLine("{0}, {1}", main.Name, main.ThePrimaryKeyId);
    foreach (var extended in db.ExtendedEntries)
        Console.WriteLine("{0}, {1}, {2}, {3}", extended.AnotherTableColumn, extended.NotTheSameNameID, extended.MainEntry.Name, extended.MainEntry.ThePrimaryKeyId);
}

That creates the following SQL script, tables...

CREATE TABLE [MainTables] (
    [ThePrimaryKeyId] [int] NOT NULL IDENTITY,
    [Name] [nvarchar](4000),
    CONSTRAINT [PK_MainTables] PRIMARY KEY ([ThePrimaryKeyId])
)
CREATE TABLE [ExtendedTables] (
    [NotTheSameNameID] [int] NOT NULL,
    [AnotherTableColumn] [nvarchar](4000),
    CONSTRAINT [PK_ExtendedTables] PRIMARY KEY ([NotTheSameNameID])
)
CREATE INDEX [IX_NotTheSameNameID] ON [ExtendedTables]([NotTheSameNameID])
ALTER TABLE [ExtendedTables] ADD CONSTRAINT [FK_ExtendedTables_MainTables_NotTheSameNameID] FOREIGN KEY ([NotTheSameNameID]) REFERENCES [MainTables] ([ThePrimaryKeyId])

And a note, as per our discussion above...
This ain't the 'splitting' - but
(a) code first IMO doesn't allow anything like that (I tried that first and also modifying the migrations manually but it's 'internally' all based on the expected column names being the same and there seems to be no way around it, for this version of EF at least.
(b) table structure wise - the tables could be made to look exactly what you need (as I said before I used it to relate the existing aspnet membership tables (which I could not change) into my user-table which has an own user-id pointing to outside/aspnet table and id.
True, you cannot make it using one C# model class - but the C# side is much more flexible and if you can control the C# that should give the same effect, to my opinion at least (like in the test, you can access it always through the extended entity, both extended and the main columns and they're always matched 1 to 1 and stay 'in sync'.
Hope this helps some
NOTE: you don't have to worry about the fk id etc. - just always access and add the Main entry via MainEntry, and id-s will be fine.

EDIT:
You could also do the following, to gain the appearance of having to deal with just one class (i.e. sort of a split)

public class ExtendedTable
{
    public int NotTheSameNameID { get; set; }
    public string AnotherTableColumn { get; set; }

    public string Name { get { return MainEntry.Name; } set { MainEntry.Name = value; } }
    // public int MainID { get { return MainEntry.ThePrimaryKeyId; } set { MainEntry.ThePrimaryKeyId = value; } }
    internal MainTable MainEntry { get; set; }

    public ExtendedTable()
    {
        this.MainEntry = new MainTable();
    }
}

...and use it like this...

var extended = new ExtendedTable { AnotherTableColumn = "Extended" + userid, Name = "Main" + userid };  

...also you can revert the direction of the fk by doing the WithRequiredPrincipal instead of dependent.
(also all references have to be w/o 'virtual' if you have required one-to-one)
(and MainTable can be made 'internal' as it's here, so it's not visible from outside - it cannot be nested as that EF doesn't allow - is treated like NotMapped)
...well, that's the best I could do:)

share|improve this answer
    
Tried this and it blew up with the error {"Invalid column name 'ExtendedTable_ThePrimaryKeyId'."} –  Josh Apr 2 '12 at 19:35
    
I've gone through this some more and I think part of the problem is the entity provider we're using. The default SQL acts as you describe, but this is a DB2 provider from IBM. –  Josh Apr 2 '12 at 19:56
    
have you tried 'cleaning' the Db, migrations? I'm using EF 4.3, latest - and I had to enable migrations - each time I usually remove db and migrations from project that redo (look at this post of min for details on that stackoverflow.com/questions/9364750/…). I can send you the working project if needed - just not sure how to do that in SO –  NSGaga Apr 2 '12 at 19:59
    
that's a new thing (to me, I see you mentioned) - still regardless of the provider - your migration file should look the same, I think - you can check there if you have the columns you should like mine SQL/tables. Migrations are a bit tricky - I'm using SQL CE for this, still MS. –  NSGaga Apr 2 '12 at 20:02
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Looks like it's been fixed in Entity Framework 6. See this issue http://entityframework.codeplex.com/workitem/388

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I would like to suggest using some data annotations like this:

MainTable
---------
MainTableId
DatabaseName

ExtendedTable
----------
NotTheSameName
AnotherColumn

public class MainTable
{
 [Key]
 public int MainTableId { get; set; }
 public string DatabaseName { get; set; }

 [InverseProperty("MainTable")]
 public virtual ExtendedTable ExtendedTable { get; set; }
}

public class ExtendedTable
{
 [Key]
 public int NotTheSameName { get; set; }

 public string AnotherColumn { get; set; }

 [ForeignKey("NotTheSameName")]
 public virtual MainTable MainTable { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the suggestion, but Data Annotations aren't an option for us in this case. Moreover, Microsoft says that whatever is possible with Data Annotations is doable with the Fluent API, and there are things you can do with the Fluent API that you cannot do with annotations. –  Josh Apr 3 '12 at 21:15
    
@Josh - The Fluent API can become tedious and does not read as directly as data annotations in my opinion. Here is the API, but the inverse property definition is rather vague: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh295843(v=vs.103).aspx. It is too bad you cannot use data annotations, they make using EF a lot easier to read and code. The accepted answer "It looks to me like this is a hole in the DbContext design." is just not true. Using either fluent api or data annotations will accomplish the inverse property mapping. –  Travis J Apr 3 '12 at 21:26
    
I disagree with you that the Fluent API is tedious or less direct. I also disagree that annotations are easier to read. But my opinion doesn't matter in this. Our problem is using the Data Annotations leaks the Entity Framework dependency into the entity objects, which means dependent projects must also have the EF reference. By separating out the entity mapping classes, we have isolated the EF dependency to the project that implements DbContext and consumes the mappings. Moreover, we are mapping the same entities to two different data stores, which require different mappings. –  Josh Apr 4 '12 at 3:40
    
If you supply an answer to the asked question, then I will revise the answer. To simply state it is "not true" without demonstrating an answer is useless. –  Josh Apr 4 '12 at 3:43
1  
@Josh - You should explicitly state the requirement for a fluent api answer if you wish to only get answers in that form. I demonstrated a technique which shows that EF does support this type of shared data, so to say "It looks to me like this is a hole in the DbContext design." with no supporting link or even an example is the answer here is useless to others trying to solve this problem. See this link for a fluent api approach and an argument against data annotations: stackoverflow.com/a/5693427/1026459 –  Travis J Apr 4 '12 at 7:08
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