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    var filePaths = Directory.GetFiles(@"\\Pontos\completed\", "*_*.csv").Select(p => new { Path = p, Date = System.IO.File.GetLastWriteTime(p) })
        .OrderBy(x => x.Date)
        .Where(x => x.Date >= LastCreatedDate);

i would like to know the value of the most recent x.Date

from this linq statement how can i get the most recent date?

please note that i do not need the filepath rather i need the DATE

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You can Order By descending, and add a .First() ad the end, or you can cast it to an array, and take the last element –  Sam I am Feb 21 '12 at 23:05
    
@SamIam i believe this will give me the name but not the most recent created date right>? –  Yuck Feb 21 '12 at 23:06
    
It will give you whatever object you specified in your .Select() method –  Sam I am Feb 21 '12 at 23:12
    
@SamIam you can also save yourself the cost of sorting the data by using Max(). –  phoog Feb 21 '12 at 23:39

6 Answers 6

var mostRecent = Directory.GetFiles(@"\\Pontos\completed\", "*_*.csv")
    .Select(p => new { Path = p, Date = System.IO.File.GetLastWriteTime(p) }) 
    .OrderBy(x => x.Date) 
    .Where(x => x.Date >= LastCreatedDate)
    .LastOrDefault(); 

or

var mostRecent = Directory.GetFiles(@"\\Pontos\completed\", "*_*.csv")
    .Select(p => new { Path = p, Date = System.IO.File.GetLastWriteTime(p) }) 
    .OrderByDescending(x => x.Date) 
    .Where(x => x.Date >= LastCreatedDate)
    .FirstOrDefault(); 
share|improve this answer
    
i believe this will give me the name but not the most recent created date right>? –  Yuck Feb 21 '12 at 23:05
    
@I__ - No, it gives you both name and date. You access by mostRecent.Date –  Erik Funkenbusch Feb 21 '12 at 23:08

Just reverse the order - also do the filtering before the ordering:

 var filePaths = Directory.GetFiles(@"\\Pontos\completed\", "*_*.csv").Select(p => new { Path = p, Date = System.IO.File.GetLastWriteTime(p) })
        .Where(x => x.Date >= LastCreatedDate)
        .OrderByDescending(x => x.Date)
        .FirstOrDefault();

Instead I would suggest you use DirectoryInfo's GetFiles() instead which returns FileInfo instances so you don't have to grab the last write time manually:

var di = new DirectoryInfo(@"\\Pontos\completed\");
var file =  di.GetFiles("*_*.csv")
              .Where(f=> f.LastWriteTimeUtc >= LastCreatedDate)
              .OrderByDescending(f => f.LastWriteTimeUtc)
              .FirstOrDefault();


if(file!=null)
{
   Console.WriteLine("Path: {0}, Last Write Time: {1}", file.FullName, 
                                                        file.LastWriteTimeUtc);
}
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i believe this will give me the name but not the most recent created date right>? –  Yuck Feb 21 '12 at 23:05
    
No, it will return an instance of an anonymous type which has both Date and Path properties - but better to use DirectoryInfo - see update. –  BrokenGlass Feb 21 '12 at 23:15

F# has a handy MaxBy() function that I like to use; the C# implementation is trivial. It allows you to avoid the cost of sorting the sequence.

See this answer for more detail: http://stackoverflow.com/a/8759648/385844

usage:

var mostRecent = Directory.GetFiles(@"\\Pontos\completed\", "*_*.csv")  
    .Select(p => new { Path = p, Date = System.IO.File.GetLastWriteTime(p) })   
    .Where(x => x.Date >= LastCreatedDate)  
    .MaxBy(x => x.Date);
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1  
+1. I'd love to see MaxBy/MinBy included in the BCL. –  spender Feb 21 '12 at 23:48

you can use the method .Take(1);

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I like FirstOrDefault better –  ämbi Feb 21 '12 at 23:05

Try this:

        var filePaths = Directory.GetFiles(@"\\Pontos\completed\", "*_*.csv")
            .Select(p => new { Path = p, Date = System.IO.File.GetLastWriteTime(p) })
            .OrderByDescending(x => x.Date)
            .Where(x => x.Date >= LastCreatedDate)
            .FirstOrDefault();

The changes to your statement are the sorting (OrderByDescending instead of OrderBy) to put the newest date "on top" and FirstOrDefault which will select the top, single item from the collection and should result in null if the collection is empty.

To get more file properties you could modify your anonymous object to include more properties, thusly:

        var filePath = Directory.GetFiles(@"\\Pontos\completed\", "*_*.csv")
            .Select(p => new { Path = p, Date = File.GetLastWriteTime(p), CreatedDate = File.GetCreationTime(p) })
            .OrderByDescending(x => x.Date)
            .Where(x => x.Date >= DateTime.Now)
            .FirstOrDefault();

        Console.WriteLine(filePath.Date);
        Console.WriteLine(filePath.Path);
        Console.WriteLine(filePath.CreatedDate);

Or more succinctly (no need for an anonymous object) you could do this:

        var filePath = new DirectoryInfo(@"\\Pontos\completed\").GetFiles("*_*.csv")
            .Select(p => p)
            .OrderByDescending(p => p.CreationTime)
            .Where(x => x.CreationTime >= DateTime.Now)
            .FirstOrDefault();

        Console.WriteLine(filePath.CreationTime);
        Console.WriteLine(filePath.FullName);
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i believe this will give me the name but not the most recent created date right>? –  Yuck Feb 21 '12 at 23:06
    
@I__: You will get the path and lastWriteTime based on the anonymous object you created. –  Paul Sasik Feb 21 '12 at 23:13

As you're using LinqToObjects, if performance is a consideration, you should perhaps consider implementing a MaxBy type method, instead of using OrderBy combined with FirstOrDefault.

I'll find you an implementation. [no need... see @phoog's answer]

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