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I'm working on a timetable generation project and I need to pre-process the data before putting it into an LP model.

I need to generate combinatorial objects to use in optimisation. The problem is very similar to the wood cutting problem.

Say my I have 3 classes {A,B,C} and 2 classrooms, I would have the following patterns:

A
AA
B
BB
C
CC
AB
AC
BC

If I had 2 classes {A, B} and 3 classrooms, I would have the following patterns:

A
AA
AAA
B
BB
BBB
AB
ABB
AAB

3 classes in 3 rooms would give:

A, B, C,
AA, AB, AC, BB, BC, CC,
AAA, AAB, AAC, ABB, ABC,
ACC, BBB, BBC, BCC, CCC

I need an efficient algorithm which generates these patterns. My actual numbers are more like 5+ classrooms and 30+ classes, but the algorithm should be able to handle much larger numbers also.

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Do you any similarities between "A, B, C" and "AA, AB, AC, BB, BC, CC". Perhaps you can create second set by doing some modifications to the first set using a panacea called dynamic programing? –  ElKamina Feb 21 '12 at 23:57
    
Much larger? Having 40 classes and 20 classrooms will generate 7984465725343800 combinations. For solving timetable using genetic algorhitm, check on tablix.org. –  Luka Rahne Feb 22 '12 at 0:16
    
@ralu I think you are exaggerating. I get 53,420,302,057 combinations for 40/20. In any case I will be using a network flow model to solve the problem which should be extremely fast and guaranteed to give an optimal solution in polynomial time. GA cannot make such a guarantee after any amount of simulation time! –  user1002358 Feb 22 '12 at 4:48
    
Formula is binomial(c+r,r)-1 where (c-class,r-room) So i was wrong. In case of 40/20, result is 4191844505805494 –  Luka Rahne Feb 22 '12 at 7:50

2 Answers 2

This is a perfect example of where a recursive strategy works well. As far as efficiency goes, no matter what algorithm you end up with you could have factorial explosion of combinations, so with any algorithm you'll quickly approach long running times with larger inputs, no matter how efficient the algorithm is.

The basic algorithm in C#-like syntax looks like:

void GenerateCombinations(string comboSoFar, string classLetters, int level, int maxLevel)
{
    foreach (char letter in classLetters)
    {
        comboSoFar = comboSoFar + letter.ToString();
        Console.WriteLine(comboSoFar);
        if (level < maxLevel)
            GenerateCombinations(comboSoFar, classLetters, level + 1, maxLevel)
    }
}

And kick off the recursive function with your baseline of:

GenerateCombinations("", "ABCD", 1, numberOfClassrooms)

I haven't had a chance to test any of this code, so it may need some tweakage. If you need serious efficiency, convert to a non-recursive style -- however chances are the relatively low order of the performance gain won't have an effect on your current requirements.

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if you're using python then you could use something like:

import itertools
import pprint

def f(classes,classrooms):
    print classes,classrooms
    classes="ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"[:classes]
    for i in range(1,classrooms+1):
        combinations=itertools.combinations_with_replacement(classes,i)
        pprint.pprint(["".join(j) for j in combinations])

f(3,2)

f(2,3)

f(3,3)

>>>
3 2
['A', 'B', 'C']
['AA', 'AB', 'AC', 'BB', 'BC', 'CC']
2 3
['A', 'B']
['AA', 'AB', 'BB']
['AAA', 'AAB', 'ABB', 'BBB']
3 3
['A', 'B', 'C']
['AA', 'AB', 'AC', 'BB', 'BC', 'CC']
['AAA', 'AAB', 'AAC', 'ABB', 'ABC', 'ACC', 'BBB', 'BBC', 'BCC', 'CCC']
>>>
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