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I'm relatively new to C++ (only minor dabbling up until now) but have experience in VBA, Java, and some Perl. Unfortunately, I feel my previous experiences may be hindering my understanding of how C++ works.

I've got a Class, Mover, which has the member variables pMovXPOS ans pMovYPOS:

//Mover.h
class Mover {

    int pMovXPOS;
    int pMovYPOS;

    ...

};

which are then accessed using setters and getters:

//Mover.cpp
int Mover::getXPOS() {
    return pMovXPOS;
}

void Mover::setXPOS(int newXPOS) {
    pMovXPOS = newXPOS;
}

int Mover::getYPOS() {
    return pMovYPOS;
}

void Mover::setYPOS(int newYPOS) {
    pMovYPOS = newYPOS;
}

When I run my code, I noticed that these values don't seem to actually change (they are set in the constructor, but after the initial instancing, they seem to act as consts).

I don't understand why this:

std::cout << "Is: " << pMovXPOS << " Should be: " << pMovXPOS << std::endl;

pMovXPOS = iNewX;

std::cout << "Is: " << pMovXPOS << " Should be: " << iNewX << std::endl;

isn't setting the variables correctly. The output of the above (as an example) is:

"Is: 3 Should be: 3"

"Is: 3 Should be: 4"

I have looked up multiple examples of code online, and see much use of pointers for similar methods/functions, but I have not been able to even get anything with pointers to compile. If someone could point me in the right direction (even if to an FAQ/How To that I can better understand), I would really appreciate it!


EDIT: After stripping my code down, I was able to get the variables to keep. I think then it is due to the fact that I have the Classes/Objects stored in a Vector. I am strapped for time just this minute. I will soon return with that specific (more like most, if not all) of my source.

Thanks so far for the help, everyone!

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closed as too localized by casperOne Feb 22 '12 at 16:30

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

10  
Try posting a full, minimal working test case of your problem. –  Clark Gaebel Feb 22 '12 at 0:48
    
shouldn't classes have public: and private: members? –  user1182183 Feb 22 '12 at 0:49
    
@Rafal, yes. But the default is private (for classes; public for structs) so you don't need it. –  paxdiablo Feb 22 '12 at 0:50
    
I don't see an actual class object being invoked so it's hard to tell the context of pMovXPOS, etc. for the cout. Is it in a method, local variable? –  ldav1s Feb 22 '12 at 0:51
1  
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's something wrong with your code that you haven't shown, since this works just fine:

#include <iostream>

class Mover {
    int pMovXPOS;

    public:

    Mover();
    void setXPOS (int newXPOS);
    int getXPOS (void);
};

Mover::Mover () { pMovXPOS = 314159; }

void Mover::setXPOS (int newXPOS) {
    std::cout << "Is: " << pMovXPOS << " Should be: " << pMovXPOS << '\n';
    pMovXPOS = newXPOS;
    std::cout << "Is: " << pMovXPOS << " Should be: " << newXPOS << '\n';
}

int Mover::getXPOS (void) { return pMovXPOS; }

int main (void) {
    Mover mover;
    std::cout << "Initially: " << mover.getXPOS() << '\n';
    mover.setXPOS (42);
    std::cout << "Finally: " << mover.getXPOS() << '\n';
    return 0;
}

printing:

Initially: 314159
Is: 314159 Should be: 314159
Is: 42 Should be: 42
Finally: 42

You can use that above code as a model for what you're trying to create.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree. I stripped down my code to do only this (similar to yours) and it DID work. I will try to work with this and build on it. –  Gaffi Feb 22 '12 at 4:02
add comment
    std::cout << "Is: " << pMovXPOS << " Should be: " << pMovXPOS << std::endl;

    pMovXPOS = iNewX;   
  // if you can set it like this why use setter and getter? Use public     
 //member functions to set private data members

    std::cout << "Is: " << pMovXPOS << " Should be: " << iNewX << std::endl;
share|improve this answer
    
This function is within the Mover class, but was as ineffective as the setters. Sorry the lack of clarity from the original question. –  Gaffi Feb 22 '12 at 10:15
    
try to edit your question and improve clarity. Post only the relevant parts –  Rohit Feb 22 '12 at 10:25
add comment

Maybe try using the public: keyword

class Mover {

public:  //either here, to do things like setting the variables from outside the class directly
    int pMovXPOS;
    int pMovYPOS;

    ...

};

or here:

 class Mover {

    int pMovXPOS;
    int pMovYPOS;

public:   //to make the accessor functions public
    void setXPOS(int newXPOS);
    ...

};

EDIT: adding minimal working example:

class Mover
{
    int pMovXPOS;
 public:
    Mover(){pMovXPOS=5;};
    void setXPOS(int newXPOS){pMovXPOS = newXPOS;};
    int getXPOS(){return pMovXPOS;};

};

int main(){
  Mover m;
  cout << m.getXPOS() << ",";
  m.setXPOS(7);
  cout << m.getXPOS() << endl;
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Will it help with the situation described in the question? How? –  Benjamin Lindley Feb 22 '12 at 0:57
    
@Darren Access specifiers has nothing to do with the modification of the variable(s). In a given scope, they decide whether they are accessible or not. –  Mahesh Feb 22 '12 at 0:57
    
I'm not so sure about that, Darren. The former breaks the whole point of getters and setters (encapsulation). The latter fixes a problem that isn't there - if the member functions were private, you'd never get the code to link. The fact that the program is running seems to indicate the member functions are already public, otherwise you wouldn't be able to call them. –  paxdiablo Feb 22 '12 at 0:59
    
Getters and setter don't usually improve encapsulation. They're just a cumbersome way of exposing data, rather than encapsulating it. Why getter and setter methods are evil –  bames53 Feb 22 '12 at 6:24
    
@bames53, then people aren't doing it right :-) [SG]etters are absolutely necessary for touching published attributes of an object - note the word attribute, not data - the attribute may be modified somehow in translation to internal data, aiding encapsulation. I also said published, obviously you should only have [sg]etters for externally available attributes. The only alternative I can see is to allow direct access to the data, which is much worse. You're probably right in this case since you could provide functions like goLeft(distance) or turnLeft(degrees), goForward(distance). –  paxdiablo Feb 23 '12 at 1:26
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