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Does anyone know how to find the modes in an array when there are more then one mode? I have this code that finds one mode. But I'm dealing with an array which has more than one mode, a multimodal array and I have to print each mode exactly once. Here is my code, can someone help me out? Thanks.

public static int mode(int a[])
{
    int maxValue=0, maxCount=0;

    for (int i = 0; i < a.length; ++i)
    {
        int count = 0;
        for (int j = 0; j < a.length; ++j)
        {
            if (a[j] == a[i]) ++count;
        }

        if (count > maxCount)
        {
            maxCount = count;
            maxValue = a[i];
        }
    }

    return maxCount;
}

public static Integer[] modes(int a[])
{
    List<Integer> modes = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    int maxCount=0;
    for (int i = 0; i < a.length; ++i)
    {
        int count = 0;
        for(int j = 0; j < a.length; ++j)
        {
            if (a[j] == a[i]) ++count;
        }

        if (count > maxCount)
        {
            maxCount = count;
            modes.clear();
            modes.add(a[i]);
        }
        else if (count == maxCount)
        {
            modes.add(a[i]);
        }
    }
    return modes.toArray(new Integer[modes.size()]);
}
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Is this homework? –  Louis Wasserman Feb 22 '12 at 1:06
    
not really, I program on a website online and it's one of the problems. –  extremez Feb 22 '12 at 1:08
    
@DanielFarmer the elements in your integer array has a defined range of values, like arr[k] is between 1 and 100, or it can store any integer value? –  Luiggi Mendoza Feb 22 '12 at 1:22
    
The values of the array will be input. these values can range from (10 ≤ ai ≤ 1000) –  extremez Feb 22 '12 at 1:23
    
Your implementation gratuitously traverses the input array n^2 times for an input array of size n. Woot's approach is much faster. –  paislee Feb 22 '12 at 1:43
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since your elements will be between 10 and 1000, you can use a Counter array. In this Counter array, you can store the counts of the value of the a[i] element. I think you can understand this better in code:

public static List<Integer> mode(int[] a) {
    List<Integer> lstMode = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    final int MAX_RANGE = 1001;
    int[] counterArray = new int[MAX_RANGE]; //can be improved with some maths :)!
    //setting the counts for the counter array.
    for (int x : a) {
        counterArray[x]++;
    }
    //finding the max value (mode).
    int maxCount = counterArray[0];
    for(int i = 0; i < MAX_RANGE; i++) {
        if (maxCount < counterArray[i]) {
            maxCount = counterArray[i];
        }
    }
    //getting all the max values
    for(int i = 0; i < MAX_RANGE; i++) {
        if (maxCount == counterArray[i]) {
            lstMode.add(new Integer(i));
        }
    }
    return lstMode;
}

If your input will have elements outside of 1000, you can look for the Map answer (like in other posts).

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We should do this the easy way and utilize a Map data structure in the following format:

Map<Integer,Integer>  

And then keep a running total, afterwards you iterate over the keyset and pull the highest value(s) from the Map.

If you want to stay with the List implementation you can do the following to remove dupes:

Set s = new HashSet(list);  
list = new ArrayList(s);
share|improve this answer
    
Your implementation gratuitously traverses the input array n^2 times for an input array of size n. Woot's approach is much faster. –  paislee Feb 22 '12 at 1:36
    
I believe it is 2n traversals. 1 for the check on insert, 1 for the keyset –  Woot4Moo Feb 22 '12 at 1:40
    
Sorry for the confusion. By "your" I meant the OP. I will cp it as a question comment. +1 –  paislee Feb 22 '12 at 1:43
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One approach is to run (approximately) your current code twice: the first time, find maxCount, and the second time, print out each value that occurs maxCount times. (You'll need to make some modifications in order to print each mode only once, instead of printing it maxCount times.)

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that's exactly my problem... I already got it to print maxCount times, but I have no idea how to print it exactly once. –  extremez Feb 22 '12 at 1:26
    
@DanielFarmer: Post your current code -- the code that prints it maxCount times -- and I'll give you another hint. :-) –  ruakh Feb 22 '12 at 1:28
    
sure, i edited my question. returns an Integer[] which prints the modes maxCount times. –  extremez Feb 22 '12 at 1:31
1  
@DanielFarmer: The problem is that for each i, you start again with j = 0. If you start instead at j = i, then only the first occurrence of the maxValue will reach the right count. Alternatively, you can still start at j = 0, but then if you find a match with j < i, then you can break out of the inner loop, secure in the knowledge that you've already examined this value. –  ruakh Feb 22 '12 at 1:43
1  
can you try my solution? :) –  Luiggi Mendoza Feb 22 '12 at 3:01
show 5 more comments

Instead of having a single maxValue, store the modes in an ArrayList<Integer>.

if (count == maxCount)
{
    modes.add(a[i]);
}
else if (count > maxCount)
{
    modes.clear(); // discard all the old modes
    modes.add(a[i]);
    maxCount = count;
}

and start with j = i instead of j = 0.

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i tried that.. but it won't print the modes only once :( –  extremez Feb 22 '12 at 1:35
1  
@DanielFarmer You are right - sorry about that. I fixed the bug. –  tom Feb 22 '12 at 1:58
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Since your array values only range from [10,1000], you could use a Map<Integer,Integer> to store a mapping between each discovered array value (map key) and its count (map value). A HashMap would work very well here.

To increment the count:

int count = (map.contains(a[i]) ? map.get(a[i]) : 1;
map.put(a[i],count);

Continue to track the max count like you already do, and at the end, just iterate over the map and collect all map keys with a map value equal to the max count.

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