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 $(' .middle.clear > .post_home:first ').css('padding-left', '270px !important');

This code in Firefox starts from element one, while in Chrome starts from element zero. How should i treat it?

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What's your HTML look like? –  Aaron Powell Feb 22 '12 at 2:16
    
Show us the HTML and an example of what is selected in FF vs. Chrome (or better yet create a jsFiddle). –  glortho Feb 22 '12 at 2:18
    
i'd love to see a jsfiddle.net –  mcgrailm Feb 22 '12 at 4:59
    
problem with the server. I'll be back ASAP with jsFiddle –  t0s Feb 22 '12 at 8:59
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could achieve a similar effect in a fraction of the time with:

document.querySelector(".middle.clear > .post_home").style.paddingLeft = "270px";

!important is unneeded here because inline styles always take precedence, to my knowledge.

This works much, much faster because jQuery has to run several hundred commands internally to create the jQuery object, then another hundred to set the CSS on it.

Note however that IE7 and below do not support querySelector, but this article provides an excellent way to implement querySelector in IE7 and below.

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Try using the eq() selector to specify an index in the set of elements you are trying to traverse. You should also try to avoid nesting many class selectors, as this can result in poor performance. Try using ID's instead.

Also, when you are specifying the !important tag, make sure to not leave a space between the CSS style and the important tag. The below code will add a padding-left CSS attribute to the first post_home class element within an element with a class of both clear and middle.

$('.middle.clear .post_home').eq(0).css('padding-left', '270px!important');
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selectors like :first, :last, :nth-child(2) work when all child elements are matched.

In your case $(' .middle.clear > .post_home:first ') will assume that you have following structure

<div class="middle clear">
 <div class="post_home">
 <!-- content -->
 </div>
 <!-- no other element of class other than post_home allowed here -->
 <div class="post_home">
 <!-- content -->
 </div>
 <!-- no other element of class other than post_home allowed here -->
 <div class="post_home">
 <!-- content -->
 </div>
 <!-- no other element of class other than post_home allowed here -->
</div>

Here all child elements have class post_home and all of them are matched by your selector. You are having some other elements which aren't matched by it so you are getting this anomalous behavior. Try using $(' .middle.clear > .post_home ')[0].style.paddingLeft = "270px"; or $(' .middle.clear > .post_home ').get(0).style.paddingLeft = "270px";

Tip: Use ul li sructure if you want to use such selectors.

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