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This is in reference to the problem posted in: http://projecteuler.net/problem=11

I have encountered an oversimplified solution using python as follows:(mayoff)

grid = [[0]*23]*3 + [[int(x) for x in line.split()]+[0,0,0] for line in
'''08 02 22 97 38 15 00 40 00 75 04 05 07 78 52 12 50 77 91 08
49 49 99 40 17 81 18 57 60 87 17 40 98 43 69 48 04 56 62 00
81 49 31 73 55 79 14 29 93 71 40 67 53 88 30 03 49 13 36 65
52 70 95 23 04 60 11 42 69 24 68 56 01 32 56 71 37 02 36 91
22 31 16 71 51 67 63 89 41 92 36 54 22 40 40 28 66 33 13 80
24 47 32 60 99 03 45 02 44 75 33 53 78 36 84 20 35 17 12 50
32 98 81 28 64 23 67 10 26 38 40 67 59 54 70 66 18 38 64 70
67 26 20 68 02 62 12 20 95 63 94 39 63 08 40 91 66 49 94 21
24 55 58 05 66 73 99 26 97 17 78 78 96 83 14 88 34 89 63 72
21 36 23 09 75 00 76 44 20 45 35 14 00 61 33 97 34 31 33 95
78 17 53 28 22 75 31 67 15 94 03 80 04 62 16 14 09 53 56 92
16 39 05 42 96 35 31 47 55 58 88 24 00 17 54 24 36 29 85 57
86 56 00 48 35 71 89 07 05 44 44 37 44 60 21 58 51 54 17 58
19 80 81 68 05 94 47 69 28 73 92 13 86 52 17 77 04 89 55 40
04 52 08 83 97 35 99 16 07 97 57 32 16 26 26 79 33 27 98 66
88 36 68 87 57 62 20 72 03 46 33 67 46 55 12 32 63 93 53 69
04 42 16 73 38 25 39 11 24 94 72 18 08 46 29 32 40 62 76 36
20 69 36 41 72 30 23 88 34 62 99 69 82 67 59 85 74 04 36 16
20 73 35 29 78 31 90 01 74 31 49 71 48 86 81 16 23 57 05 54
01 70 54 71 83 51 54 69 16 92 33 48 61 43 52 01 89 19 67 48'''.split('\n')
] + [[0]*23]*3

import operator

print max([reduce(operator.mul, [grid[y+n*d[0]][x+n*d[1]] for n in (0,1,2,3)])
        for x in xrange(0,20) for y in xrange(3,23)
        for d in ((0,1),(1,0),(1,1),(-1,1))])

The grid is simply a 2-dimensioanl matrix equivalent to the 20x20 matrix given in the problem. My understanding with the max() function is that it takes a list of integers as an input and then selects from it the maximum value and returns it.

The question is, how come the succeeding for-loops in the last expression are located outside the parameter list in max()? This sounds confusing to me since to create a list using a for-loop we can do it with the following:

>>> line = "12 12 12 12 12 12"
>>> [x for x in line.split()]
['12','12','12','12','12','12']

and doing something similar below would result into an error

>>> [x] for x in line.split()
share|improve this question
3  
So what's the question? – CppLearner Feb 22 '12 at 3:23
    
Is not any issue with max clarified by docs.python.org/library/functions.html#max ? – Dan D. Feb 22 '12 at 3:26
    
it's not outside the for loop, its outside the reduce function but within the list comprehension max([reduce() for ... for .. for ... for]) – platinummonkey Feb 22 '12 at 3:52
1  
@CppLearner I just edited the question since I messed up with the enter key. – akino Feb 22 '12 at 3:53
    
@platinummonkey aw.. thanks for that. I barely didnt see the right-hand bracket at the end. – akino Feb 22 '12 at 4:17

After your clarification - actually, they are not, if you look better, you have this:

print max(
      [
        reduce(
          operator.mul, 
          [grid[y+n*d[0]][x+n*d[1]] for n in (0,1,2,3)])
        for x in xrange(0,20) 
        for y in xrange(3,23)
        for d in ((0,1),(1,0),(1,1),(-1,1))
      ])

To reduce some clutter, what you have is this:

print max(
      [
        reduce(...)
        for x in ...
        for y in ...
        for d in ...
      ])

i.e.:

print max([reduce(...) for x in ... for y in ... for d in ...])

which is a list comprehension such as the one you gave as an example ([x for x in line.split()] ).

See the documentation:

Excerpt:

max(iterable[, args...][key])

With a single argument iterable, return the largest item of a non-empty iterable (such as a string, tuple or list). With more than one argument, return the largest of the arguments.

You can do e.g. this:

>>> max(1, 2, 3)
3

i.e. run max with a number of parameters and it will give you the maximum of these, or e.g. you can do this:

>>> max([1,2,3])
3

and it will treat it as the iterable and give you the maximum in an iterable. Strings are iterables, so you can do this, too:

>>> max("aqrmn")
'r'

or this:

>>> max(dict(the=1,biggest=-1,word=2,maybe=4,this=0))
'word'

where it considers keys of a dictionary, maybe easier to grasp like this:

>>> max({1:"hey", 5:"man", -3:"how", 7:"are", 3: "you?"})
7

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
I have edited my previous question since I messed up with the enter key. Sorry for that but thanks with the help anyway. – akino Feb 22 '12 at 3:43
    
Thanks for the rearranging the code. =) It looked confusing on the original. – akino Feb 22 '12 at 5:16
>> help(max)
max(...)
    max(iterable[, key=func]) -> value
    max(a, b, c, ...[, key=func]) -> value

    With a single iterable argument, return its largest item.
    With two or more arguments, return the largest argument.

That max does return the maximum value. If you want the location do:

a =  [reduce(operator.mul, [grid[y+n*d[0]][x+n*d[1]] for n in (0,1,2,3)])
         for x in xrange(0,20) for y in xrange(3,23)
         for d in ((0,1),(1,0),(1,1),(-1,1))
max_value = max(a)
max_value_position = a.index(max_value)

Not exactly sure what you want. But you did get the maximum value of the list created.

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