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I am trying to return an IEnumerable from a method that is backed by a BlockingCollection. The code pattern is:

public IEnumerable<T> Execute() {   
    var results = new BlockingCollection<T>(10);  
    _ExecuteLoad(results);   
    return results.GetConsumingEnumerable(); 
}

private void _ExecuteLoad<T>(BlockingCollection<T> results) {
    var loadTask = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    { 
        //some async code that adds items to results
        results.CompleteAdding();
    });
}

public void Consumer() {
    var count = Execute().Count();
}

The problem is the enumerable returned from Execute() is always empty. The examples that I have seen all iterate the BlockingCollection in a Task. That seems like it won't work in this situation.

Does anyone know where I am going wrong?


To make things a little more clear, I am pasted the code that I'm executing to populate the collection. Perhaps there is something that causes the issue in here?

Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
{
    var continuationRowKey = "";
    var continuationParitionKey = "";
    var action = HttpMethod.Get;
    var queryUri = _GetTableQueryUri(tableServiceUri, tableName, query, continuationParitionKey, continuationRowKey, timeout);
    while (true)
    {
        using (var request = GetRequest(queryUri, null, action.Method, azureAccountName, azureAccountKey))
        {
            request.Method = action;
            request.RequestUri = queryUri;

            using (var client = new HttpClient())
            {
                var sendTask = client.SendAsync(request, HttpCompletionOption.ResponseHeadersRead);
                using (var response = sendTask.Result)
                {
                    continuationParitionKey = // stuff from headers
                    continuationRowKey = // stuff from headers

                    var streamTask = response.Content.ReadAsStreamAsync();
                    using (var stream = streamTask.Result)
                    {
                        using (var reader = XmlReader.Create(stream))
                        {
                            while (reader.Read())
                            {
                                if (reader.NodeType == XmlNodeType.Element && reader.Name == "entry" && reader.NamespaceURI == "http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom")
                                {
                                    results.Add(XNode.ReadFrom(reader) as XElement);
                                }
                            }
                            reader.Close();
                        }
                    }
                }
            }

            if (continuationParitionKey == null && continuationRowKey == null)
                break;

            queryUri = _GetTableQueryUri(tableServiceUri, tableName, query, continuationParitionKey, continuationRowKey, timeout);
        }
    }
    results.CompleteAdding();
});
share|improve this question
1  
It doesn't solve the problem, but there's not much point calling ...Async() methods if you're just going to using Result straight away. –  Porges Feb 22 '12 at 8:33
    
Your code original code works fine for me. Have you tried debugging the code in your Task to see why it never calls Add()? Because that's the most likely explanation. –  svick Feb 22 '12 at 11:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to call results.CompleteAdding() when you have finished adding items to the collection.

If you don't, the enumeration will never end and Count() will never return.

Apart from that, the code you've posted is correct.

share|improve this answer
    
I should have added that. The problem is that method returns right away, and the enumeration is always empty. –  Erick T Feb 22 '12 at 5:32
    
Count() will block until the enumeration completes. Have you tried putting a breakpoint on CompleteAdding()? –  Nicholas Butler Feb 22 '12 at 6:11
    
Thanks for the answer. It turned out that I had an unrelated bug that was causing the CompleteAdding to not get called. Thanks! –  Erick T Feb 22 '12 at 19:00

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