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I am following this tutorial from MSDN.

There's something I saw in the code that I can't understand

    private void PopulateTreeView()
    {
        TreeNode rootNode;

        DirectoryInfo info = new DirectoryInfo(@"../.."); // <- What does @"../.." mean?
        if (info.Exists)
        {
            rootNode = new TreeNode(info.Name);
            rootNode.Tag = info;
            GetDirectories(info.GetDirectories(), rootNode);
            treeView1.Nodes.Add(rootNode);
        }
    }
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2  
possible duplicate of What's the @ in front of a string in C#? –  M.Babcock Feb 22 '12 at 4:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

@ is for verbatim string, so that the string is treated as is. Especially useful for paths that have a \ which might be treated as escape characters ( like \n)

../.. is relative path, in this case, two levels up. .. represents parent of current directory and so on.

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.. is the container directory. So ../.. means "up" twice.
For example if your current directory is C:/projects/a/b/c then ../.. will be C:/projects/a

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Why downvote? what's wrong with my answer? –  shift66 Feb 22 '12 at 4:57
    
Not the downvoter but . represents the current directory and .. would be one level up, maybe someone was upset reading your first line and hence voted you down –  V4Vendetta Feb 22 '12 at 5:42
    
Pretty sure it's because the OP knows what ../.. means; he didn't know what @ means. It's the combination that threw him off, especially because the @ is redundant here anyway. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Feb 22 '12 at 12:00

new DirectoryInfo(@"../..") means "a directory two levels above the current one".

The @ denotes a verbatim string literal.

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