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I'm trying to modify an existing library to work with both iPhone and iPad. There are a couple of statements I'd like to modify:

#define width 320
#define height 50

I would like to do something like:

if([[UIDevice currentDevice] userInterfaceIdiom] == UIUserInterfaceIdiomPhone){
  #define width X
  #define height Y }
else {
  #define width A
  #define height B
}

However it seems I can't do this. Is there a way to achieve something like this? Thanks

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4 Answers 4

You can use #if:

 #if TARGET_DEVICE_IPHONE // note this may be different, don't have acces to Xcode right now.
 #define width X
 #define height Y
 #else
 #define width A
 #define height B
 #endif

Or just make a simple inline function:

static inline int width()
{
      return [[UIDevice currentDevice] userInterfaceIdiom] == UIUserInterfaceIdiomPhone ? X : A;
}

static inline int height()
{
    return [[UIDevice currentDevice] userInterfaceIdiom] == UIUserInterfaceIdiomPhone ? Y : B;
}
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#define is a preprocessor definition. This means that this is the first thing done in compilation. It basically just pastes the definition everywhere in the code before it begins compiling.

But since your if statements are executed at runtime rather than compile time, you'll either need to change your if statements to preprocessor if's (#if, not recommended), or change your width/height to be defined at runtime (strongly recommended). This should look like this:

int width, height;
if([[UIDevice currentDevice] userInterfaceIdiom] == UIUserInterfaceIdiomPhone){
  width = X;
  height = Y;
else {
  width = A;
  height = B;
}

and then from then on simply use the width and height values for your width and height.

If you still want to label X,Y,A,B, rather than using #define (compile time constants), use runtime constants:

static const int iPhoneWidth = X;
static const int iPhoneHeight = Y;
static const int iPadWidth = A;
static const int iPadHeight = B;

if([[UIDevice currentDevice] userInterfaceIdiom] == UIUserInterfaceIdiomPhone){
  width = iPhoneWidth;
  height = iPhoneHeight;
else {
  width = iPadWidth;
  height = iPadHeight;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Please state a reason for downvoting. –  arasmussen Feb 22 '12 at 6:38
1  
+1 because in this case it's really recommended to define width/height at runtime. You probably received -1 because you didn't really answer the original question: how to use 'if' with #define. Anyway: if he is compiling two different targets (one for iPhone one for iPad) and not one (universal) then there is nothing wrong at using #if to define this properties at compile time. –  rokjarc Feb 22 '12 at 8:32

you can do this way,

#define width (([[UIDevice currentDevice] userInterfaceIdiom] != UIUserInterfaceIdiomPhone) ? A : x)
#define height (([[UIDevice currentDevice] userInterfaceIdiom] != UIUserInterfaceIdiomPhone) ? B : Y)
share|improve this answer
1  
If you use width and height a hundred times around your application the compiler is going to paste this ugly code all over the place. You really should avoid macros where possible. –  arasmussen Feb 22 '12 at 6:08
    
@arasmussen, thanks for your suggestion. will keep that in mind. –  Vignesh Feb 22 '12 at 6:15

How about something like this:

#define widthPhone 320
#define widthPad 400
#define heightPhone 50
#define heightPad 90

if ([[UIDevice currentDevice] userInterfaceIdiom] == UIUserInterfaceIdiomPhone) {
    width = widthPhone;
    height = heightPhone;
} else {
    width = widthPad;
    height = heightPad;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Probably want to use static consts rather than #defines. –  arasmussen Feb 22 '12 at 6:03

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