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I was wondering if it's possible to create and use a pointer to a non-static member-function. When I compile my code without the pointer to the member-function being static, it gives a compilation error.

Thanks...

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Maybe you should show us a short extract of your code so that we can understand your issue better. Don't forget to mention the compilation error. –  J.N. Feb 22 '12 at 6:10
    
actually I need to use a function pointer give in a C header file. tht func pointer should point to a member function in my C++ header. when i invoke a function in tht C lib(i need to pass func pointer to my member function).How to do this? –  Yogi Feb 22 '12 at 6:48
    
Function pointers and static member function pointers are compatible, however non-static member function pointers have a hidden this parameter and are incompatible. –  Jesse Good Feb 22 '12 at 7:14
    
@Jesse: There's a lot more to non-static members than just a hidden this. –  Nicol Bolas Feb 22 '12 at 8:18
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Yes, it is possible to create pointer to member functions in C++. See this FAQ: pointers-to-members

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actually I need to use a function pointer give in a C header file. tht func pointer should point to a member function in my C++ header. when i invoke a function in tht C lib(i need to pass func pointer to my member function).How to do this? –  Yogi Feb 22 '12 at 6:49
    
@Yogi You can't. All instances of a class share its functions, a pointer to this address alone isn't enough to know which instance should be called. The general solution (say in the win32 API) is to pass a static function around and store the this pointer somewhere so that it can be accessed in the static function and forwarded from there. –  Voo Feb 22 '12 at 7:29
    
Thx for your reply. I did this and it worked. –  Yogi Feb 22 '12 at 8:00
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In short: Yes, it's possible, and no, it doesn't do what you think.

The crucial fact is that non-static member functions are not functions (just like a Douglas-fir is not a fir). They are member functions, and that's something different. They can only be invoked on a given object instance.

Thus in order to call the member function X::foo() of a given instance X a;, i.e. to perform the call a.foo(), you need both the information that you want to use X::foo(), and that you want to invoke it on the instance a. The former is provided by a pointer-to-member-function, which is not a pointer, and the latter is provided by an instance pointer or reference:

struct X { int foo(bool, char); };  // class definition

X a;          // an instance
X * p = &a;   // just for demonstration

int (X::*)(bool, char) ptmf = &X::foo;   // pointer-to-member-function

Now to invoke:

(a.*ptmf)(false, 'a');
(p->*ptmp)(true, 'z');

In a nutshell: foo alone does not let you call anything. The callable entity is the pair (&X::foo, a), which lets you call a.foo().

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actually I need to use a function pointer give in a C header file. tht func pointer should point to a member function in my C++ header. when i invoke a function in tht C lib(i need to pass func pointer to my member function).How to do this? –  Yogi Feb 22 '12 at 6:49
1  
@Yogi in C there is no concept of "member function", so no "pointer to non-existent concept" exist. What you can do is write a plain function taking one extra paramenter that is the object pointer to be used to call the member function. –  Emilio Garavaglia Feb 22 '12 at 7:35
    
Thx for your reply. I did this and it worked. –  Yogi Feb 22 '12 at 8:01
    
If you need the pointer to function for a C program, the function itself must be extern "C". Some compilers don't detect this error, but others will; the C++ standard requires a diagnosis of some sort. –  James Kanze Feb 22 '12 at 8:40
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