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I'm reading through someone else's code, and I see a lot of instances of this. I'll provide a snippet. It's a library function, which wraps nHibernate. It's the fifth line, after the session is created that I'm confused about.

public T GetById<T>(string id) where T : BaseObject
{
     T retObj = null;
     ISession session = EnsureCurrentSession();
     {
          retObj = session.Get<T>(id);
     }

     return retObj;
}

At first glance I thought it was an example of the using statement, but it's not. As far as I can see, the curly braces might as well not be there. The only practical purpose for setting up a block there would be to create variables inside and their scope be limited to the block, but that's not happening here.

Or am I missing something?

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3  
I think it is just a strange coding style... –  NoviceProgrammer Feb 22 '12 at 6:26

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The braces here are superfluous, however, you are correct, you can create braces in order to create variables within the scope of that block. However, this pattern is very rarely used.

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That code looks like an incomplete edit; the code is legal but weird.

To follow up on your statement:

The only practical purpose for setting up a block there would be to create variables inside and their scope be limited to the block

That is a practical purpose for creating a block but not the only purpose. For example:

class C
{
    public int x;
    void M()
    {
        x = 123;
        if (whatever)
        {
            int x = q;
        }
    }
}

This code is not legal because the simple name x is used inconsistently throughout the block which first uses it. x means this.x at first, and a local variable later. That's not legal in C#; in C# a name may only mean one thing throughout the block which first uses the name.

You could "fix" the problem by...

class C
{
    public int x;
    void M()
    {
        {
           x = 123;
        }
        if (whatever)
        {
            int x = q;
        }
    }
}

Because now the two blocks that use the same name to mean two different things do not overlap in any way. But that is a dumb way to fix the problem; the better thing to do is rename the local.

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Indeed in this case it does nothing. It might be the leftover of a using block actually, i.e. the code could have looked like this in a previous version:

using (ISession session = EnsureCurrentSession())
{
   retObj = session.Get<T>(id);
}

As it is now, I would review how EnsureCurrentSession is implemented. Possibly the using should really be there, or if not, remove the braces.

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Yes, I think this is right. We have code exactly like this in our code base (with using). I can imagine that someone wanted to remove the using, but was lazy to remove the braces as well. –  svick Feb 22 '12 at 16:08

I think you're not missing anything - the braces don't do anything in this case.

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Actually, the braces after a new statement are meant to initialize variables in the class. This subject was discussed earlier in another post.

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Not missing anything. They are superfluous, and frankly, bad to leave such code. But it might have been changed / added as habit for when a code does require local scope / using.

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My best guess is that there used to be a if (session != null) there once upon a time. Then there was a code review where it was pointed out the test is unnecessary because EnsureCurrentSession() never returns null, it throws an Exception if session is not current.

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