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Is there a way to pass more data into a callback function in Jquery?

I have two functions and I want the callback to the $.post, for example, to pass in both the resulting data of the AJAX call, as well as a few custom arguments

function clicked() {
    var myDiv = $("#my-div");
    // ERROR: Says data not defined
    $.post("someurl.php",someData,doSomething(data, myDiv),"json"); 
    // ERROR: Would pass in myDiv as curData (wrong)
    $.post("someurl.php",someData,doSomething(data, myDiv),"json"); 
}

function doSomething(curData, curDiv) {

}

I want to be able to pass in my own parameters to a callback, as well as the result returned from the AJAX call.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
10  
It's worth mentioning that jQuery.ajax() has had a context setting since ver 1.4 (jquery14.com/day-01/jquery-14) see an example of its usage here: stackoverflow.com/questions/5097191/ajax-context-option/… –  russau Oct 5 '11 at 8:34
    
+1 for the comment of russau, I think that is the best way :) –  BlackHawkDesign Apr 12 '12 at 13:59

14 Answers 14

up vote 201 down vote accepted

The solution is the binding of variables through closure.

I haven't used the .post function in jQuery, but a quick scan of the documentation suggests the call back should be a function pointer accepting the following:

function callBack(data, textStatus, jqXHR) {};

Therefore I think the solution is as follows:

var doSomething = function(extraStuff) {
    return function(data, textStatus, jqXHR) {
        // do something with extraStuff
    };
};

var clicked = function() {
    var extraStuff = {
        myParam1: 'foo',
        myParam2: 'bar'
    }; // an object / whatever extra params you wish to pass.

    $.post("someurl.php", someData, doSomething(extraStuff), "json");
};

What is happening?

In the last line, doSomething(extraStuff) is invoked and the result of that invocation is a function pointer.

Because extraStuff is passed as an argument to doSomething it is within scope of the doSomething function.

When extraStuff is referenced in the returned anonymous inner function of doSomething it is bound by closure to the outer function's extraStuff argument. This is true even after doSomething has returned.

I haven't tested the above, but I've written very similar code in the last 24 hours and it works as I've described.

You can of course pass multiple variables instead of a single 'extraStuff' object depending on your personal preference/coding standards.

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14  
Thanks for the explanation -- that was really helpful! –  ash Jun 3 '09 at 1:03
    
What is the purpose of 'var doSomething = '? How is this different from just declaring doSomething as a function (ie function doSomething(...) {} ) –  ranomore Sep 23 '10 at 18:33
5  
That's not true. Different scope rules apply to these two function declarations. The behavior differs a lot depending on JS runtime (read browser). Also try to compare the function name shown in stacktrace/breakpoint in Firebug. –  Ihor Kaharlichenko May 25 '11 at 7:51
1  
Holy *! Nice one! –  sinni800 Jun 7 '11 at 9:02
1  
Ihor: You're absolutely correct about the difference between the two declaration styles. A good explanation is here: stackoverflow.com/questions/336859/… –  bradhouse Oct 4 '11 at 0:37

For me, and other newbies who has just contacted with Javascript,
I think that the Closeure Solution is a little kind of too confusing.

While I found that, you can easilly pass as many parameters as you want to every ajax callback using jquery.

Here are two easier solutions.

First one, which @zeroasterisk has mentioned above, example:

var $items = $('.some_class');
$.each($items, function(key, item){
    var url = 'http://request_with_params' + $(item).html();
    $.ajax({
        selfDom     : $(item),
        selfData    : 'here is my self defined data',

        url         : url,
        dataType    : 'json',
        success     : function(data, code, jqXHR){
            // in $.ajax callbacks, 
            // [this] keyword references to the options you gived to $.ajax
            // if you had not specified the context of $.ajax callbacks.
            // see http://api.jquery.com/jquery.ajax/#jQuery-ajax-settings context
            var $item = this.selfDom;
            var selfdata = this.selfData;
            $item.html( selfdata );
            ...
        } 
    });
});

Second one, pass self-defined-datas by adding them into the XHR object which exists in the whole ajax-request-response life span.

var $items = $('.some_class');
$.each($items, function(key, item){
    var url = 'http://request_with_params' + $(item).html();
    $.ajax({
        url         : url,
        dataType    : 'json',
        beforeSend  : function(XHR) {
            // 为了便于回调,把当前的 jquery对象集存入本次 XHR
            XHR.selfDom = $(item);
            XHR.selfData = 'here is my self defined data';
        },
        success     : function(data, code, jqXHR){
            // jqXHR is a superset of the browser's native XHR object
            var $item = jqXHR.selfDom;
            var selfdata = jqXHR.selfData;
            $item.html( selfdata );
            ...
        } 
    });
});

As you can see these two solutions has a drawback that : you need write a little more code every time than just write:

$.get/post (url, data, successHandler);

Read more about $.ajax : http://api.jquery.com/jquery.ajax/

share|improve this answer

A more general solution for sending asynchronous requests using the .ajax() jQuery API and closures to pass additional parameters to the callback function:

function sendRequest(method, url, content, callback) {
    // additional data for the callback
    var request = {
        method: method,
        url: url
    };

    $.ajax({
        type: method,
        url: url,
        data: content
     }).done(function(data, status, xhr) {
        if (callback) callback(xhr.status, data, request);
     }).fail(function(xhr, status) {
        if (callback) callback(xhr.status, xhr.response, request);
     });
};
share|improve this answer

Let's go simple ! :)

$.ajax({
    url: myUrl,
    context: $this, // $this == Current $element
    success: function(data) {
        $.proxy(publicMethods.update, this)(data); // this == Current $element
    }
});
share|improve this answer
data: '{"month":' + month + ',' + "year:" + year + '}', 

This will work for 2 parameters. The server side function is:

public static List<VersionSet> GetAllVersionSet(int month, int year)
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function custom_func(p1,p2) {
    var local='test';
    $.post(AJAX_FILE_PATH,{op:'dosomething',p1:p1},
        function(data){
            return function(data){
                alert(p2);
                alert(local);
            }(p2,local)
        }
    );
}
share|improve this answer

It's actually easier than everyone's making it sound... especially if you use the $.ajax({}) base syntax vs. one of the helper functions.

Just pass in the key: value pair like you would on any object, when you setup your ajax request... (because $(this) hasn't changed context yet, it's still the trigger for the bind call above)

<script type="text/javascript">
$(".qty input").bind("keypress change", function() {
    $.ajax({
        url: "/order_items/change/"+$(this).attr("data-order-item-id")+"/qty:"+$(this).val()+"/returnas.json",
        type: "POST",
        dataType: "json",
        qty_input: $(this),
        anything_else_i_want_to_pass_in: "foo",
        success: function(json_data, textStatus, jqXHR) {
            /* here is the input, which triggered this AJAX request */
            console.log(this.qty_input);
            /* here is any other parameter you set when initializing the ajax method */
            console.log(this.anything_else_i_want_to_pass_in);
        }
    });
});
</script>

One of the reasons this is better than setting the var, is that the var is global and as such, overwritable... if you have 2 things which can trigger ajax calls, you could in theory trigger them faster than ajax call responds, and you'd have the value for the second call passed into the first. Using this method, above, that wouldn't happen (and it's pretty simple to use too).

share|improve this answer
    
this is exactly what I was looking for. I didn't know when you specified the dataType as json it automatically parsed the response for you. That nice (: –  Rooster Apr 27 '12 at 15:38
    
Sounds like best way to pass extra params to callback to me. I would be interested if anyone sees a drawback with this approach? Easiest and most elegant. Thanks! –  Jan Zyka Jan 24 '13 at 7:18
    
"the var is global and as such, overwritable". It is not if you declare it within a function, which is also much more readable than the solution above. Using closures is a cleaner approach - see my answer here: stackoverflow.com/a/18570951/885464 –  Lorenzo Polidori Sep 3 '13 at 8:51

As an addendum to b01's answer, the second argument of $.proxy is often used to preserve the this reference. Additional arguments passed to $.proxy are partially applied to the function, pre-filling it with data. Note that any arguments $.post passes to the callback will be applied at the end, so doSomething should have those at the end of its argument list:

function clicked() {
    var myDiv = $("#my-div");
    var callback = $.proxy(doSomething, this, myDiv);
    $.post("someurl.php",someData,callback,"json"); 
}

function doSomething(curDiv, curData) {
    //"this" still refers to the same "this" as clicked()
    var serverResponse = curData;
}

This approach also allows multiple arguments to be bound to the callback:

function clicked() {
    var myDiv = $("#my-div");
    var mySpan = $("#my-span");
    var isActive = true;
    var callback = $.proxy(doSomething, this, myDiv, mySpan, isActive);
    $.post("someurl.php",someData,callback,"json"); 
}

function doSomething(curDiv, curSpan, curIsActive, curData) {
    //"this" still refers to the same "this" as clicked()
    var serverResponse = curData;
}
share|improve this answer

In today's world there is a another answer that is cleaner, and taken from another Stack Overflow answer:

function clicked()
{
    var myDiv = $( "#my-div" );

    $.post( "someurl.php", {"someData": someData}, $.proxy(doSomething, myDiv), "json" );
}

function doSomething( data )
{
    // this will be equal to myDiv now. Thanks to jQuery.proxy().
    var $myDiv = this;

    // doing stuff.
    ...
}

Here's the original question and answer: jQuery HOW TO?? pass additional parameters to success callback for $.ajax call?

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I've made a mistake in the last my post. This is working example for how to pass additional argument in callback function:

function custom_func(p1,p2) {
    $.post(AJAX_FILE_PATH,{op:'dosomething',p1:p1},
        function(data){
            return function(){
                alert(data);
                alert(p2);
            }(data,p2)
        }
    );
    return false;
}
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1  
You should either edit your original answer, or delete it before adding a new one. –  Blazemonger Nov 29 '11 at 19:15

When using doSomething(data, myDiv), you actually call the function and does not make a reference to it.

You can either pass the doStomething function directly but you must ensure it has the correct signature.

If you want to keep doSomething the way it is, you can wrap its call in an anonymous function.

function clicked() {
    var myDiv = $("#my-div");
    $.post("someurl.php",someData, function(data){ 
      doSomething(data, myDiv)
    },"json"); 
}

function doSomething(curData, curDiv) {
    ...
}

Inside the anonymous function code, you can use the variables defined in the enclosing scope. This is the way Javascript scoping works.

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2  
This is the best solution IMO, for the sake of clarity. No extra return function(...){...} function within the doSomething function. I found another clear example of the same concept here: theelitist.net/… –  William Denniss Oct 31 '11 at 8:28

You can use a closure of JavaScript:

function wrapper( var1, var2,....) // put here your variables
{
  return function( data, status)
  {
     //Handle here results of call
  }
};

and when you can do:

$.post("someurl.php",data,wrapper(var1, var2, etc...),"html");
share|improve this answer

You can also try something like the following:

function clicked() {

    var myDiv = $("#my-div");

    $.post("someurl.php",someData,function(data){
        doSomething(data, myDiv);
    },"json"); 
}

function doSomething(curData, curDiv) {

}
share|improve this answer

actually, your code is not working because when you write:

$.post("someurl.php",someData,doSomething(data, myDiv),"json");

you place a function call as the third parameter rather than a function reference.

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