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I've got a git repository where I'm the only committer, so far, and that has already been published on github. I found that a few commits, being done from a different computer, has the wrong author information. My idea was to remove the repository from github, rewrite history and republish it as new. For such purpose I've created a simple script:

git filter-branch --commit-filter '
            GIT_COMMITTER_NAME="Author Name";
            GIT_AUTHOR_NAME="Author Name";
            GIT_COMMITTER_EMAIL="email";
            GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL="email";
            git commit-tree "$@";

    ' HEAD

which should rename all commits. The problem is that git replies with

Cannot rewrite branch(es) with a dirty working directory.

but a git status provides me

# On branch master
nothing to commit (working directory clean)

Any idea about what am I missing? Any suggestion on how to rename all commits without loosing the history will be appreciated.

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What version of Git are you using? See stackoverflow.com/a/9246622/6309 –  VonC Feb 22 '12 at 7:12
2  
try to issue a git reset --hard to clean the Working tree. –  Eduardo Feb 22 '12 at 7:14
    
Seems that a reset fixed the problem. I was already running an updated git version (1.7.2.5). –  fluca1978 Feb 22 '12 at 9:21
    
You also have to export those environment variables –  knittl Feb 22 '12 at 10:07
    
You don't need to remove and re-add repository at GitHub. Just git push --force –  Vi. Feb 27 '12 at 22:21
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1 Answer 1

Try deleting untracked files in your working directory by running git clean -dxf.

Also, you'll need to export those variables in your commit-filter. If you don't, Git won't see them so they won't alter Git's default behavior.

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