Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Suppose i have a messages.properties file like

windowTitle=Accessing Form Elements with JavaScript
namePrompt=Name:
passwordPrompt=Password:
confirmPasswordPrompt=Confirm Password:

I have a entry for this in my faces-config.xml like this

<faces-config version="2.0"
    xmlns="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee" 
    xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" 
    xsi:schemaLocation="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee/web-facesconfig_2_0.xsd">

    <application>
        <resource-bundle>
            <base-name>pk.mazars.basitMahmood.messages</base-name>
            <var>msgs</var>
        </resource-bundle>
    </application>

</faces-config>

On my xhtml page i can access it like this

<h:panelGrid columns="2" columnClasses="evenColumns, oddColumns">
    #{msgs.namePrompt}
    <h:inputText/>
    #{msgs.passwordPrompt}
    <h:inputSecret id="password"/>
    #{msgs.confirmPasswordPrompt}
    <h:inputSecret id="passwordConfirm"/>
</h:panelGrid>

But how can i read this file from Java. Like, suppose i have to print a message like this, or prompt the user like Name must be entered

System.out.println(msgs.namePrompt + "must be entered")

How can i read the msgs.namePrompt value from my java code.

Also suppose i have a entry in my message file like this

sure=Are you sure, you want to delete the <Field>?
remove=Are you sure you want to remove the<Field> and <Field>?
close=Are you sure you want to mark the <Field> as Closed?
created=<Field> is successfully created
updated=<Field> is successfully updated

Is there any technique that i can pass parameter to my messages.properties file. Like i want to do something like this in my java code

System.out.println(msgs.sure("Name"));   //<Field> is replace with Name
System.out.println(msgs.remove("Age", "Gender"));  //  First Field replace by Age, and second is replace by Gender

Thank you.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 30 down vote accepted

Parameterized resource strings in facelets:

As described in this tutorial, you can use h:outputFormat and f:param to replace your paramters in a resource bundle string:

<h:outputFormat value="#{msg['message.param1']}">
   <f:param value="param0" />
</h:outputFormat>
<h:outputFormat value="#{msg['message.param2']}">
   <f:param value="param0" />
   <f:param value="param1" />
</h:outputFormat>

//properties file
message.param1 = This is "message.param1" - {0}
message.param2 = This is "message.param2" - {0} and {1}

In Java you can access a property file like this:

import java.util.ResourceBundle;
...
ResourceBundle rb = ResourceBundle.getBundle("pk.mazars.basitMahmood.messages");

Parameterized properties can be processed with the javax.text.MessageFormat class:

MessageFormat.format(rb.getString(key), params);

If you are working with different locales and parameterized and non-parameterized properties, you can use a short helper method like this:

public static String getMessageResourceString(String bundleName, String key, Object params[], Locale locale) {

        String text;
        ResourceBundle bundle = ResourceBundle.getBundle(bundleName, locale);

        try {
            text = bundle.getString(key);
        } catch (MissingResourceException e) {
            text = "?? key " + key + " not found ??";
        }

        if (params != null) {
            MessageFormat mf = new MessageFormat(text, locale);
            text = mf.format(params, new StringBuffer(), null).toString();
        }

        return text;
    }
share|improve this answer

Thanks Matt Handy:). Here i am posting my answer. I also used a method which is same as yours but with description(comment) added. Here is my code that i am using. This is complete example that anyone can use :)

messages.properties file

windowTitle=Accessing Form Elements with JavaScript
namePrompt=Name:
passwordPrompt=Password:
confirmPasswordPrompt=Confirm Password:
message.param1 = This is "message.param1" - {0}
message.param2 = This is "message.param2" - {0} and {1}

faces-config.xml file

<application>
    <resource-bundle>
        <base-name>pk.mazars.basitMahmood.messages</base-name>
        <var>msgs</var>
    </resource-bundle>
</application>

index.xhtml file

<h:body>

    <h:form>

        <h:panelGrid columns="2" columnClasses="evenColumns, oddColumns">
            #{msgs.namePrompt}
            <h:inputText id="name" value="#{readMessages.name}" />
            #{msgs.passwordPrompt}
            <h:inputSecret id="password" value="#{readMessages.password}"/>
            #{msgs.confirmPasswordPrompt}
            <h:inputSecret id="passwordConfirm"/>

        </h:panelGrid>

        <!--A normal way to access the message.

                <h:outputText value="{msg.message}" />

                //properties file
                message = This is "message"

            For a key that has a dot “.” as name, you can’t use the normal way {msg.message.test1}, it
            will not work. Instead, you should use bracket like {msg['message.test1']}.

                <h:outputText value="{msg['message.test1']}" />

                //properties file
                message.test1 = This is "message.test1"

            To display HTML tag in the message, just add the “escape” attribute and set it to false.

                <h:outputText value="{msg['message.test2']}" />
                <h:outputText value="{msg['message.test2']}" escape="false" />
                <h:outputText value="{msg['message.test3']}" />
                <h:outputText value="{msg['message.test3']}" escape="false" />

                //properties file
                message.test2 = This is "<h2>message.test3</h2>"
                message.test3 = This is "&lt;h2&gt;message.test4&lt;/h2&gt;"

        -->
        <h:outputFormat value="#{msgs['message.param1']}">
            <f:param value="param0" />
        </h:outputFormat>

        <h:outputFormat value="#{msgs['message.param2']}">
            <f:param value="param0" />
            <f:param value="param1" />
        </h:outputFormat>

        <h:commandButton  type="button" value="Submit Form" 
                          onclick="checkPassword(this.form)"/>

    </h:form>

</h:body>

java file

@Named(value="readMessages")
@RequestScoped
public class ReadMessages {

    private String name;
    private String password;

    /** Creates a new instance of ReadMessages */
    public ReadMessages() {

        String[] message1 = {"Basit", "Masood"};

        //FacesMessage message = getMessage(
               // "pk.mazars.basitMahmood.messages", "message.param2", new Object[]{new String("arg1")});

        String message = getMessage(
                "pk.mazars.basitMahmood.messages", "message.param2", message1);

        System.out.println();

    } // end of constructor

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public String getPassword() {
        return password;
    }

    /**
     * For proper localization, you will want to retrieve error messages from a message bundle.
     * Doing that involves some busywork with locales and class Loader.
     *
     * @param bundleName
     * @param resourceId
     * @param params
     * @return
     */
    public static String getMessage(String bundleName, String resourceId, Object[] params) {

        /**
         * Get the current locale.
         *     FacesContext context = FacesContext.getCurrentInstance();
         *     UIViewRoot viewRoot = context.getViewRoot();
         *     Locale locale = viewRoot.getLocale();
         *
         */
        FacesContext context = FacesContext.getCurrentInstance();

        /**
         * Recall that an application can supply a bundle name in a configuration file,
         * such as
         *
         *     <faces-config>
         *         <application>
         *             <message-bundle>pk.mazars.basitMahmood.messages</message-bundle>
         *         </application>
         *         ...
         *     </faces-config>
         *
         * The following code snippet retrieves that bundle name:
         *
         *     Application app = context.getApplication();
         *     String appBundleName = app.getResourceBundle();
         */
        Application app = context.getApplication();
        String appBundle = app.getMessageBundle();

        //get Locale
        Locale locale = getLocale(context);

        /**
         * Get the current class loader.  You need it to locate the resource bundle
         *
         *     ClassLoader loader = Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader();
         *
         */
        ClassLoader loader = getClassLoader();

        /**
         * Get the resource bundle with the given name, locale and class loader
         *
         *     ResourceBundle bundle = ResourceBundle.getBundle(bundleName, locale, loader);
         *
         */
        String summary = getString(appBundle, bundleName, resourceId, locale, loader, params);

        if (summary != null) {

            //summary = "????" + resourceId + "????";
            return summary ;

        }

        String detail = getString(appBundle, bundleName, resourceId + "detail", locale, loader, params);
        return detail;
        //return new FacesMessage(summary, detail);

    } //end of getMessage()

    public static String getString(String bundle, String resourceId, Object[] params) {

        FacesContext context = FacesContext.getCurrentInstance();
        Application app = context.getApplication();
        String appBundle = app.getMessageBundle();
        Locale locale = getLocale(context);
        ClassLoader loader = getClassLoader();
        return getString(appBundle, bundle, resourceId, locale, loader, params);

    } //end of getString()

    public static Locale getLocale(FacesContext context) {

        Locale locale = null;
        UIViewRoot viewRoot = context.getViewRoot();

        if (viewRoot != null) {

            locale = viewRoot.getLocale();

        } //end of if (viewRoot != null)

        if (locale == null) {

            locale = Locale.getDefault();

        } //end of if (locale == null)

        return locale;

    } //end of getLocale()

    public static ClassLoader getClassLoader() {

        /**
         * The Java ClassLoader is a crucial, but often overlooked, component of the Java run-time system.
         * It is the class responsible for finding and loading class files at run time.
         *
         * Among commercially popular programming languages, the Java language distinguishes itself by
         * running on a Java virtual machine (JVM). This means that compiled programs are expressed in
         * a special, platform-independent format, rather than in the format of the machine they are
         * running on. This format differs from traditional executable program formats in a number of
         * important ways.
         *
         * In particular, a Java program, unlike one written in C or C++, isn't a single executable file,
         * but instead is composed of many individual class files, each of which corresponds to a single
         * Java class.
         *
         * Additionally, these class files are not loaded into memory all at once, but rather are loaded
         * on demand, as needed by the program. The ClassLoader is the part of the JVM that loads
         * classes into memory.
         */
        ClassLoader loader = Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader();

        if (loader == null) {

            /**
             * Whether you override findClass or loadClass, getSystemClassLoader gives you direct
             * access to the system ClassLoader in the form of an actual ClassLoader object (instead
             * of accessing it implicitly through the findSystemClass call).
             */
            loader = ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader();

        } //end of if (loader == null)

        return loader;

    } //end of getClassLoader()

    public static String getString(String bundle1, String bundle2, String resourceId,
        Locale locale, ClassLoader loader, Object[] params) {

        String resource = null;
        ResourceBundle bundle;

        if (bundle1 != null) {

            bundle = ResourceBundle.getBundle(bundle1, locale, loader);

            if (bundle != null) {

                try {

                    /**
                     * Get the resource string with the given ID from the bundle.
                     *
                     *     String resource = bundle.getString(resourceId);
                     *
                     */
                    resource = bundle.getString(resourceId);

                } catch (MissingResourceException e) {
                }

            } //end of if (bundle != null)

        } //end of if (bundle1 != null)

        if (resource == null) {

            bundle = ResourceBundle.getBundle(bundle2, locale, loader);

            if (bundle != null) {

                try {

                    /**
                     * Get the resource string with the given ID from the bundle.
                     *
                     *     String resource = bundle.getString(resourceId);
                     *
                     */
                    resource = bundle.getString(resourceId);

                } catch (MissingResourceException e) {
                }

            } //end of if (bundle != null)

        } //end of if (resource == null)

        if (resource == null) {

            return null;  // no match

        }

        if (params == null) {

            return resource;

        }

        /**
         * Finally, you may want some messages to provide detailed information about the
         * nature of the error. For example, you want to tell the user which character
         * in the credit card number was objectionable. Message strings can contain
         * place-holders {0}, {1} and so on - for exanple
         *
         *     The card number contains the invalid character {0}.
         *
         * The java.text.MessageFormat class can substitute values for the placeholders:
         *
         *     Object[] params = ...;
         *     MessageFormat formatter = new MessageFormat(resource, locale);
         *     String message = formatter.format(params);
         *
         * Here, the params array contains the values that should be substituted.
         */
        MessageFormat formatter = new MessageFormat(resource, locale);
        return formatter.format(params);

    } //end of getString()

} //end of class ReadMessages
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.