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I have a little problems understand what's going on behind the scenes of the "type T" to get this right, I'm hopping that some of you can show me a light at the end of the tunnel :)

I have a COM object that I assign almost the some things (properties) but I need to use this for all objects, and I want to do this once and only that will work with all types.

Printer type:

switch (type)
{
    case convert2pdf.ConvertFileType.Word: 
        WordPrintJob oPrintJob = null; break;
    case convert2pdf.ConvertFileType.Excel: 
        ExcelPrintJob oPrintJob = null; break;
    case convert2pdf.ConvertFileType.PowerPoint: 
        PowerPointPrintJob oPrintJob = null; break;
    case convert2pdf.ConvertFileType.IE: 
        IEPrintJob oPrintJob = null; break;
    case convert2pdf.ConvertFileType.Publisher: 
        PublisherPrintJob oPrintJob = null; break;
    case convert2pdf.ConvertFileType.Visio: 
        VisioPrintJob oPrintJob = null; break;

    default: 
        GenericPrintJob oPrintJob = null; break;
}

and then, no matter what my object type that I created, I implement every time this:

PDFSetting oPDFSetting = null;

oPrintJob = oPrinter.GenericPrintJob;
oPDFSetting = oPrintJob.PDFSetting;

/*put water mark on the first page, set the water mark text to "BCL EasyPDF */
oPDFSetting.set_Watermark(0, true);
oPDFSetting.set_WatermarkColor(0, (uint)System.Drawing.ColorTranslator.ToOle(System.Drawing.Color.Blue));
oPDFSetting.set_WatermarkFirstPageOnly(0, true);
oPDFSetting.set_WatermarkText(0, "EasyPDF");

/*set the meta data for the pdf file*/
oPDFSetting.MetaData = true;
oPDFSetting.MetaDataAuthor = "Your Name";
oPDFSetting.MetaDataCreator = "BCL";
oPDFSetting.MetaDataKeywords = "PDF";
oPDFSetting.MetaDataSubject = "Converter";
oPDFSetting.MetaDataTitle = "easyPDF SDK";

How do I use the "type T" thingy (men... after 3 years of C# I still can't understand that no matter what I read, and I read Wikipedia, ASP.NET 3.5 Professional book, tutorials, ...) :(

In other words is, how can I reuse the properties.

I thought about creating an ExtensionMethod, but I will have to write all of them and not reuse any code... I thought about Creating a Generic control and create a new controls that inherit that base one so I could use

GlocalObject oPrintJob = null;

...

WordPrintJob oPrintJob = (WordPrintJob)GlocalObject;

am I making any sense?


Update from the answers

Ok, so, there is no "type T" but base class/interface... I'm then trying to create that Interface so I can inherit from it and I get this image below:

alt text

If in the interface I say PrintJob type, how can I return a WordPrintJob type? :-( I don't get it ... any help please? Thank you so much.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You'll need to define a base class PrintJob and have PDFSetting as a property of that.

Then define WordPrintJob, ExcelPrintJob etc. to be subclasses of PrintJob.

It's a long time since I've done this so I can't remember off hand whether you'll be able to access PDFSettings from the sub class or if you'll have to cast the variable to the base class first.

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Chris is essentially correct so your switch statement would look thus::

PrintJob oPrintJob = null;
switch (type)
{
    case convert2pdf.ConvertFileType.Word: 
        oPrintJob = new WordPrintJob(); 
        break;
    case convert2pdf.ConvertFileType.Excel: 
        oPrintJob = new ExcelPrintJob(); 
        break;
    case convert2pdf.ConvertFileType.PowerPoint: 
        oPrintJob = new PowerPointPrintJob(); 
        break;
    case convert2pdf.ConvertFileType.IE: 
        oPrintJob = new IEPrintJob(); 
        break;
    case convert2pdf.ConvertFileType.Publisher: 
        oPrintJob = new PublisherPrintJob(); 
        break;
    case convert2pdf.ConvertFileType.Visio: 
        oPrintJob = new VisioPrintJob(); 
        break;
    default: 
        oPrintJob = new GenericPrintJob();
        break;
}

The PDFSettings property would be defined in your base PrintJob class and each of the specific print job classes would inherit from that base class.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the code. I never cease to be amazed by how much I forget if I don't use it on a daily basis! –  ChrisF Jun 2 '09 at 12:10
    
tried the Interface, but I don't get how to get this right, how do I create a method that can return all those types? –  balexandre Jun 2 '09 at 13:25
    
As chills42 says, the method will always return PrintJob. Sounds like you may need a brief refresher on object oriented development. Inheritance and Polymorphism are the keywords for you here. –  Lazarus Jun 2 '09 at 14:04
    
Yes I do ... back to the reading ... thxs for the help! It is very appreciated –  balexandre Jun 2 '09 at 15:12

Along with Lazurus's answer, you may also want to create an Interface, and do most of your coding against it, instead of the base class.

share|improve this answer
    
tried the Interface, but I don't get how to get this right, how do I create a method that can return all those types? –  balexandre Jun 2 '09 at 13:25
3  
You don't. You return the base type. Let polymorphism do the dirty work. –  Benjamin Autin Jun 2 '09 at 13:30
    
As Lazarus said... I need to go back to the reading ... thxs for the help! It is very appreciated –  balexandre Jun 2 '09 at 15:12

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