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I work with JSON and I want to count the number of elements in the response.

    $.getJSON("/api/getEvents", function(data) {
        $.each(data, function(key, event) {
            var count = 10;
            $.getJSON("/api/getUsers", function(data) {
                $.each(data, function(key, event) {
                    alert("Value: " + count);
                    count++;
                });
            });
            alert("Count: " + count);
        });
    });

As a result, I get:

Value: 10
Value: 11
Value: 12
...
Count: 10

Why count = 10?

share|improve this question
    
I'm not quite sure, that's why I'm not posting this as an answer, but I believe that in $.getJSON you create a closure, which only captures the reference to the variable count. – helpermethod Feb 22 '12 at 8:46
    
It looks to me like data from the getUsers call is an empty array. You set count to 10, you increment it zero times, then it alerts Count: 10. – Ben Lee Feb 22 '12 at 8:47
    
@BenLee No, array is not empty. I can get the value of elements from data. – Anton Tsivarev Feb 22 '12 at 8:51
    
When you say "As a result, I get..." what do you mean by "you get"? Is this console output? Alerts? Where are the "Value: ..." lines coming from -- I don't see that in the code anywhere? – Ben Lee Feb 22 '12 at 8:52
    
@BenLee Sorry, the parser ate line. Alerts. – Anton Tsivarev Feb 22 '12 at 8:54
up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's because ajax requests are asynchronous. $.getJSON just initiates a request, but javascript execution immediately continues. You can see the count if you move the alert inside the ajax callback:

$.getJSON("/api/getEvents", function(data) {
    $.each(data, function(key, event) {
        var count = 10;
        $.getJSON("/api/getUsers", function(data) {
            $.each(data, function(key, event) {
                alert("Value: " + count);
                count++;
            });

            // I moved this here:
            alert("Count: " + count);
        });
        // It used to be here.
    });
});

So after you set var count = 10, the javascript parser then runs $.getJSON, but then immediately goes on to the next line, which in your code example alerted the "Count: 10". Then, whenever the request finishes, it runs the callback code that increments the count and alerts the Value lines.

share|improve this answer
    
Thats what I thought at first, too but in the question the alert is not where you say it is. It actually is already inside the getJSON callback. – joidegn Feb 22 '12 at 9:04
    
@Joi, that was a mistake in the question. The OP fixed it after I asked him where the "Value" lines were coming from. – Ben Lee Feb 22 '12 at 9:04
    
Thanks, I understand. – Anton Tsivarev Feb 22 '12 at 9:05

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