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I am trying to bind a list of string values to a listbox so that their values are listed line by line. Right now I use this:

<ListBox Margin="20" ItemsSource="{Binding Path=PersonNames}">
    <ListBox.ItemTemplate>
        <DataTemplate>
            <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal">
                <TextBlock Text="{Binding Path=Id}"></TextBlock>
            </StackPanel>
        </DataTemplate>
    </ListBox.ItemTemplate>
</ListBox>

But I don't know what I am supposed to put into the textblock, instead of Id, since they are all string values, not custom classes.

Also it complains not having to find the PersonNames when I have it inside MainPage, as MainPage.PersonNames.

I set the data context to:

DataContext="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}"

I am doing it wrong?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 29 down vote accepted

If simply put that your ItemsSource is bound like this:

YourListBox.ItemsSource = new List<String> { "One", "Two", "Three" };

Your XAML should look like:

<ListBox Margin="20" Name="YourListBox">
    <ListBox.ItemTemplate> 
        <DataTemplate> 
            <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal"> 
                <TextBlock Text="{Binding}" /> 
            </StackPanel> 
        </DataTemplate> 
    </ListBox.ItemTemplate> 
</ListBox> 

Update:

This is a solution when using a DataContext. Following code is the viewmodel you will be passing to the DataContext of the page and the setting of the DataContext:

public class MyViewModel
{
    public List<String> Items
    {
        get { return new List<String> { "One", "Two", "Three" }; }
    }
}

//This can be done in the Loaded event of the page:
DataContext = new MyViewModel();

Your XAML now looks like this:

<ListBox Margin="20" ItemsSource="{Binding Items}">
    <ListBox.ItemTemplate>
        <DataTemplate>
            <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal">
                <TextBlock Text="{Binding}" />
            </StackPanel>
        </DataTemplate>
    </ListBox.ItemTemplate>
</ListBox>

The advantage of this approach is that you can put a lot more properties or complex objects in the MyViewModel class and extract them in the XAML. For example to pass a List of Person objects:

public class ViewModel
{
    public List<Person> Items
    {
        get
        {
            return new List<Person>
            {
                new Person { Name = "P1", Age = 1 },
                new Person { Name = "P2", Age = 2 }
            };
        }
    }
}

public class Person
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
}

And the XAML:

<ListBox Margin="20" ItemsSource="{Binding Items}">
    <ListBox.ItemTemplate>
        <DataTemplate>
            <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal">
                <TextBlock Text="{Binding Path=Name}" />
                <TextBlock Text="{Binding Path=Age}" />
            </StackPanel>
        </DataTemplate>
    </ListBox.ItemTemplate>
</ListBox>

Hope this helps! :)

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1  
Thanks, I am confused by YourListBox. Is it the name of the control? Do you have to the first line in code for the xaml to work? –  Joan Venge Feb 22 '12 at 9:07
1  
That was a typo, it is indeed the Name of the Control. You can also bind the items through a DataContext on your page or through Resources. The binding I gave was for demo-purposes. :) –  Abbas Feb 22 '12 at 9:09
    
Thanks, can you please give me an example for the DataContext? I am having a hard time understanding it. –  Joan Venge Feb 22 '12 at 9:13
    
See my updated answer :) –  Abbas Feb 22 '12 at 9:33
    
good explanation. very much useful –  FebinDonz Apr 4 at 9:22

You should show us the Code for PersonNames, and I am not sure, I understand your question, but maybe you want to bind it like this:

<TextBlock Text="{Binding Path=.}"/>

or

<TextBlock Text="{Binding"} />

This will bind to the current element in the list. (Assuming PersonNames is a list of strings). Otherwise, you will see the class name in the list

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With Path=. being required for two-way bindings –  Dani Nov 4 '13 at 10:52

If the items source is enumerable as string-entries, use the following:

<TextBlock Text="{Binding}"></TextBlock> 

You can use this syntax on any object. Generally, the ToString() -method will then called to get the value. This is in many cases very handy. But beware that no change notification will occur.

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Thanks, I will try this but I am still having an issue with the binding part where it complains not finding PersonNames in xaml. –  Joan Venge Feb 22 '12 at 9:10
    
+1 for editing and providing the -toString information –  ämbi Feb 22 '12 at 9:17
    
@Joan Venge: THe binding issue is another problem and not explained rapidly in a comment. I assume that the DataContext of your UserControl or Window is not set to the PersonNames-exposing instance. If it is declared in the Window or UserControl, you can add for a fast solution the following into the binding {Binding PersonNames,RelativeSource={RelativeSource Mode=FindAncestor,AncestorType=Window}} where you have to replace "Window" through "UserControl" if your ListBox is within a UserControl. Check out some posts about DataContext and MVVM, this will help you understand the DataContext –  Chris Valentine Feb 22 '12 at 9:21

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