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In the following code, why doesn't Python compile f2 to the same bytecode as f1?

Is there a reason not to?

>>> def f1(x):
    x*100

>>> dis.dis(f1)
  2           0 LOAD_FAST                0 (x)
              3 LOAD_CONST               1 (100)
              6 BINARY_MULTIPLY
              7 POP_TOP
              8 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
             11 RETURN_VALUE
>>> def f2(x):
        x*10*10

>>> dis.dis(f2)
  2           0 LOAD_FAST                0 (x)
              3 LOAD_CONST               1 (10)
              6 BINARY_MULTIPLY
              7 LOAD_CONST               1 (10)
             10 BINARY_MULTIPLY
             11 POP_TOP
             12 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
             15 RETURN_VALUE
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2 Answers 2

up vote 65 down vote accepted

This is because x could have a __mul__ method with side-effects. x * 10 * 10 calls __mul__ twice, while x * 100 only calls it once:

>>> class Foo(object):
...     def __init__ (self):
...             self.val = 5
...     def __mul__ (self, other):
...             print "Called __mul__: %s" % (other)
...             self.val = self.val * other
...             return self
... 
>>> a = Foo()
>>> a * 10 * 10
Called __mul__: 10
Called __mul__: 10
<__main__.Foo object at 0x1017c4990>

Automatically folding the constants and only calling __mul__ once could change behavior.

You can get the optimization you want by reordering the operation such that the constants are multiplied first (or, as mentioned in the comments, using parentheses to group them such that they are merely operated on together, regardless of position), thus making explicit your desire for the folding to happen:

>>> def f1(x):
...     return 10 * 10 * x
... 
>>> dis.dis(f1)
  2           0 LOAD_CONST               2 (100)
              3 LOAD_FAST                0 (x)
              6 BINARY_MULTIPLY     
              7 RETURN_VALUE 
share|improve this answer
    
Note that even is nothing is passed to the method, the result of dis is still the same i.e. if the contents of the method are: x = 9; y = x * 10 * 10;, the result is still the same viz. loading const twice. It seems that Python doesn't do whole method optimization? –  Sanjay T. Sharma Feb 22 '12 at 9:32
5  
@SanjayT.Sharma: The compiler still can't really know what x is, so it has to play it safe. Python's versatile introspection and dynamic runtime modification capabilities make it possible to change the type of x inside the function locals. –  Nick Bastin Feb 22 '12 at 9:37
6  
x*(10*10) should work also, and is a bit more explicit. –  WolframH Feb 22 '12 at 9:50
    
It could have a __mul__ method that isn't associative, or that doesn't accept an int on the RHS, for that matter. –  Karl Knechtel Feb 22 '12 at 10:43
    
@KarlKnechtel: Sure - I would classify the first under "has side-effects", and the second is irrelevant to whether you can optimize RHS constant multiplication - if it were grammatically allowed you could still do that in the compiler and properly fail in the __mul__ method –  Nick Bastin Feb 22 '12 at 10:47

Python evaluates expressions from left to right. For f2(), this means it will first evaluate x*10 and then multiply the result by 10. Try:

Try:

def f2(x):
    10*10*x

This should be optimized.

share|improve this answer
    
This worked for me in cpython 2.7.2. –  jcollado Feb 22 '12 at 9:44
1  
Cool! also confirmed on cpython 2.6.6 –  Jonathan Feb 22 '12 at 10:45

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