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Im trying to create a fragment shader that will do the same job as the photoshop levels output slider. I would like to do this on a specific channel (in this case blue).

I have the code as below:

varying highp vec2 textureCoordinate;

uniform sampler2D inputImageTexture;

#define GammaCorrection(color, gamma)       pow(color, vec3(1.0/gamma))

#define LevelsControlOutputRange(color, minOutput, maxOutput) mix(vec3(minOutput/255), vec3(maxOutput/255), color)


void main()
{

     lowp vec4 texel = texture2D(inputImageTexture, textureCoordinate);

     lowp vec3 outputColor;
     outputColor.rgb = texel.rgb;

     lowp vec3 pass3 = LevelsControlOutputRange(outputColor,200,255); 

     lowp vec4 pass4;
     pass4.r = outputColor.r;
     pass4.g = outputColor.g;
     pass4.b = pass3.b;

 gl_FragColor = pass4;


}

This has no effect on the resulting image so i think that i may have to do more with the line:

pass4.b = pass3.b;

Could anyone help point me in the right direction?

Thanks

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

mix takes a value between 0…1 as the mixing parameter. Your 255 will be clamped to 1 and therefore you'll always get the max output value. In a similar fashion texture values are in the range 0…1 to you must not divide by 255 to get into some range! BTW: Simply dividing by 255 is not correct – details here http://kaba.hilvi.org/programming/range/index.htm

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Thanks for the reply datenwolf im using the macro as defined here: mouaif.wordpress.com/2009/01/28/levels-control-shader here he divides the value by 255, is that not correct? –  Skeep Feb 22 '12 at 9:46
    
@Skeep: The server with the source code seems down, but in the article there's not divide by 255. Maybe the shader code uses integer textures, which would be weird. Anyway: You shouldn't use a macro for this. Use a function. Macros are meant for things that don't fit well into functions, like repetetive tasks performed on and with the local data of a function. –  datenwolf Feb 22 '12 at 10:05
    
thanks for pointing me in the right direction –  Skeep Feb 22 '12 at 10:14

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