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This probably never happened in the real-world yet, and may never happen, but let's consider this: say you have a git repository, make a commit, and get very very unlucky: one of the blobs end up having the same SHA-1 as another that is already in your repository. Question is, how would git handle this? Simply fail? Find a way to link the two blobs and check which one is needed according to the context?

More a brain-teaser than an actual problem, but I found the issue interesting.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 62 down vote accepted

That old answer from Linus might still be relevant:

Nope. If it has the same SHA1, it means that when we receive the object from the other end, we will not overwrite the object we already have.

So what happens is that if we ever see a collision, the "earlier" object in any particular repository will always end up overriding. But note that "earlier" is obviously per-repository, in the sense that the git object network generates a DAG that is not fully ordered, so while different repositories will agree about what is "earlier" in the case of direct ancestry, if the object came through separate and not directly related branches, two different repos may obviously have gotten the two objects in different order.

However, the "earlier will override" is very much what you want from a security standpoint: remember that the git model is that you should primarily trust only your own repository.
So if you do a "git pull", the new incoming objects are by definition less trustworthy than the objects you already have, and as such it would be wrong to allow a new object to replace an old one.

So you have two cases of collision:

  • the inadvertent kind, where you somehow are very very unlucky, and two files end up having the same SHA1.
    At that point, what happens is that when you commit that file (or do a "git-update-index" to move it into the index, but not committed yet), the SHA1 of the new contents will be computed, but since it matches an old object, a new object won't be created, and the commit-or-index ends up pointing to the old object.
    You won't notice immediately (since the index will match the old object SHA1, and that means that something like "git diff" will use the checked-out copy), but if you ever do a tree-level diff (or you do a clone or pull, or force a checkout) you'll suddenly notice that that file has changed to something completely different than what you expected.
    So you would generally notice this kind of collision fairly quickly.
    In related news, the question is what to do about the inadvertent collision..
    First off, let me remind people that the inadvertent kind of collision is really really really damn unlikely, so we'll quite likely never ever see it in the full history of the universe.
    But if it happens, it's not the end of the world: what you'd most likely have to do is just change the file that collided slightly, and just force a new commit with the changed contents (add a comment saying "/* This line added to avoid collision */") and then teach git about the magic SHA1 that has been shown to be dangerous.
    So over a couple of million years, maybe we'll have to add one or two "poisoned" SHA1 values to git. It's very unlikely to be a maintenance problem ;)

  • The attacker kind of collision because somebody broke (or brute-forced) SHA1.
    This one is clearly a lot more likely than the inadvertent kind, but by definition it's always a "remote" repository. If the attacker had access to the local repository, he'd have much easier ways to screw you up.
    So in this case, the collision is entirely a non-issue: you'll get a "bad" repository that is different from what the attacker intended, but since you'll never actually use his colliding object, it's literally no different from the attacker just not having found a collision at all, but just using the object you already had (ie it's 100% equivalent to the "trivial" collision of the identical file generating the same SHA1).

The question of using SHA-256 is regularly mentioned, but not act upon for now.


Note (Humor): you can force a commit to a particular SHA1, with the project gitbrute from Brad Fitzpatrick (bradfitz).

gitbrute brute-forces a pair of author+committer timestamps such that the resulting git commit has your desired prefix.

Example: https://github.com/bradfitz/deadbeef

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twist: still hashes the same after adding /* This line added to avoid collision */ :D you can win the lottery twice :P –  Janus Troelsen May 18 '13 at 14:19
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@JanusTroelsen sure, but it is still a lottery, is it not? ;) (as mention in this short note about SHA1) –  VonC May 18 '13 at 14:22
    
@VonC regarding that reference: is an outburst of a global werewolf epidemic - wiping out all humanity and resulting in the gruesome death of all my developers on the same night, even though they were geographically distributed - considered an unrelated incident?? Of course, assuming it happened on a full moon, obviously. Now, such a scenario would change things. Even thinking about it is insanity! That is on an entire different scale of probability! That would mean we must... STOP USING GIT! NOW!!! EVERYONE RUUUUUN!!!!!!! –  Daniel Dinnyes Mar 26 at 15:15

According to Pro Git:

If you do happen to commit an object that hashes to the same SHA-1 value as a previous object in your repository, Git will see the previous object already in your Git database and assume it was already written. If you try to check out that object again at some point, you’ll always get the data of the first object.

So it wouldn't fail, but it wouldn't save your new object either.
I don't know how that would look on the command line, but that would certainly be confusing.

A bit further down, that same reference attempts to illustrate the likely-ness of such a collision:

Here’s an example to give you an idea of what it would take to get a SHA-1 collision. If all 6.5 billion humans on Earth were programming, and every second, each one was producing code that was the equivalent of the entire Linux kernel history (1 million Git objects) and pushing it into one enormous Git repository, it would take 5 years until that repository contained enough objects to have a 50% probability of a single SHA-1 object collision. A higher probability exists that every member of your programming team will be attacked and killed by wolves in unrelated incidents on the same night.

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I'd like to see the source for the numbers on the last sentence ;-) –  Joachim Sauer Feb 22 '12 at 12:11
    
@JoachimSauer Why don't you follow the link given? –  Jasper Jan 7 '13 at 8:14
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@Jasper: that link is good documentation, but it does not contain statistics on the probability of every member of a team being attacked and killed by wolves in unrelated incidents on the same night. –  Joachim Sauer Jan 7 '13 at 8:15
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@Jasper: Well, the way I read it, the text literally claims that the probability of 6.5 billion team members getting killed by wolves on the same night is higher than 50%. But my main objection to his statement is that such an event would have to be a worldwide phenomenon; it's inconceivable that this could occur due to unrelated incidents. ;) –  Keith Robertson Sep 18 '13 at 13:12
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@KeithRobertson I am pretty sure the post is talking about the chance of all your actual team members being eaten compared to the chance of a hash collision if everyone on the world was producing insane amounts of code, alongside the time it takes under those circumstances to get to a 50% chance of a collision (i.e. the wolves incident didn't involve the entire world and the 50% was separate from the wolves). You did get the point though, if such an event is inconceivable, so should a git hash collision be. (Of course, one is (almost) purely chance based and the other isn't, but still.) –  Jasper Sep 19 '13 at 16:27

I think cryptographers would celebrate.

Quote from Wikipedia article on SHA-1:

In February 2005, an attack by Xiaoyun Wang, Yiqun Lisa Yin, and Hongbo Yu was announced. The attacks can find collisions in the full version of SHA-1, requiring fewer than 2^69 operations. (A brute-force search would require 2^80 operations.)

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The point is that a flaw has been found in SHA1 and that this was about the time when Git was being introduced. Also, probability is non-linear. Just because you play the lottery for fifty years does not mean you have a higher chance of winning. You just have the same chance every single time. The person playing for the first time can still win. –  0xC0000022L Feb 8 at 4:11

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