Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Table 1 -> id, name
Table 2 -> id, name, text_value, table1_id, table3_id
Table 3 -> id, name

SELECT * FROM `table1`   
LEFT OUTER JOIN table2 ON table1.id = table2.table1_id   
WHERE 
 (
     (table2.table3_id = '7' AND table2.name like ('%test%'))
 )   
  AND 
 (
      table2.table3_id = '1' and table2.text_value like ('%fast update%'))
 )   
GROUP BY table1.id  
ORDER BY table1.id desc
share|improve this question
    
If you have the same boolean operator (AND) between conditions, you could remove all parenthesis since you don't need to change the default order of evaluation –  Stelian Matei Feb 22 '12 at 10:01
1  
I can see what he's asking for @mazzucci , he wants to see if table1 contains both requested records in table 3, hence the odd AND. What he has ended up with is an impossible WHERE –  Simon at mso.net Feb 22 '12 at 10:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, but you need two joins to do so:

  • Because you will be joining to table2 twice, one of the joins must use an alias. I chose t2.
  • Change the AND to LEFT OUTER JOIN table2 AS t2 ON.
  • In the remainder of the query, change table2 to t2.
  • When you use GROUP BY, all the columns that you specify need to be in either the GROUP BY clause or an aggregate. Since you didn't do that, and it is unclear why you tried to use GROUP BY, I am eliminating the GROUP BY clause.

There are several other changes. See final query below:

SELECT
  table1.id
FROM
  table1
    LEFT OUTER JOIN
  table2
    ON table1.id = table2.table1_id
    LEFT OUTER JOIN
  table2 t2
    ON table1.id = t2.table1_id
WHERE
  table2.table3_id = '7'
    and
  table2.name like '%test%'
    AND
  t2.table3_id = '1'
    and
  t2.text_value like '%fast update%'
ORDER BY
  table1.id DESC
share|improve this answer

Short answer, yes.

Longer answer, having re-read your question a few times the following will work but won't be the most efficient query in the world, I strongly urge you to re-examine what you are trying to accomplish and whether table restructuring would be a good idea.

I opted for INNER JOIN as you are only interested in rows which match both criteria, and so NULL rows are unimportant. The HAVING clause ensures only rows which match both are output, while having the table2 restrictions within the ON clause helps limit the performance impact.

SELECT 
    table1.*,
    COUNT(DISTINCT(table3.id)) AS numberOfMatches 
FROM table1


INNER JOIN table2 
ON table2.table1_id = table1.id
AND (
    (table2.table3_id = 7 AND table2.name LIKE '%test%') 
    OR 
    (table2.table3_id = 1 AND table2.text_value LIKE '%fast update%')
)

INNER JOIN table3
ON table3.id = table2.table3_id

GROUP BY table1.id
HAVING numberOfMatches = 2
ORDER BY table1.id DESC
share|improve this answer
SELECT * 
FROM `table1` a LEFT OUTER JOIN table2 b ON a.id = b.table1_id   
WHERE 
 (
     b.table3_id = '7' AND b.name like '%test%'
 )   
  AND 
 (
      b.table3_id = '1' and b.text_value like '%fast update%'
 )   
GROUP BY a.id  
ORDER BY a.id desc
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.