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I have a file containing data like so:

2012-01-02 GREEN 4
2012-01-02 GREEN 6
2012-01-02 GREEN 7
2012-01-02 BLUE 4
2012-01-02 BLUE 3
2012-01-02 GREEN 4
2012-01-02 RED 4
2012-01-02 RED 8
2012-01-02 GREEN 4
2012-01-02 YELLOW 5
2012-01-02 YELLOW 2

I can't always predict what the strings are going to be in the second column (so in the example above there are colours but the data file could contain any string in column two). There is always however a number in the third column (which I want the max value of for a paticular string in column two). Is awk able to:

  1. Pull out each of the unique strings in column 2?
  2. For each of the unique strings get the maximum associated value (so using the above you'd end up with the following)?:

    2012-01-02 GREEN 7
    2012-01-02 BLUE 4
    2012-01-02 RED 8
    2012-01-02 YELLOW 5
    

or would this be easier with Perl (or even shell)? any code examples much appreciated!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted
$ sort -k2,2 -k3,3nr input.txt | awk 'x!=$2{x=$2;print}'
2012-01-02 BLUE 4
2012-01-02 GREEN 7
2012-01-02 RED 8
2012-01-02 YELLOW 5
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Thanks kev, much appreciated - could you explain what the awk is doing after the pipe? –  4rd2 Feb 22 '12 at 10:15
    
@4rd2 awk select first line of every group(group by column 2). –  kev Feb 22 '12 at 10:23
    
This works if preserving order is not an issue. –  potong Feb 22 '12 at 13:10
    
+1, but you don't need sort. awk can do it, albeit a bit more verbosely –  glenn jackman Feb 22 '12 at 15:19

You can do it in perl or awk with pretty much the same technique (using associative arrays).

Here's an awk example. max contains the (current) maximum for a given "key", lines the line that that max happened on.

max[$2] < $3 {
  max[$2] = $3
  lines[$2] = $0
}
END {
  for (x in lines)
    print lines[x]
}
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+1. You can write the first block a bit more concisely by putting the if-condition outside the block: max[$2] < $3 {max[$2] = $3; lines[$2] = $0} –  glenn jackman Feb 22 '12 at 15:20
    
Neat! Hadn't thought about writing it like that at all, thanks. –  Mat Feb 22 '12 at 15:25
    
Both forms are valid, but this is less C-like, more awk-like. –  glenn jackman Feb 22 '12 at 15:29

This might work for you:

cat -n file | sort -ruk2 | sort -uk2,3 | sort -n | cut -f2
2012-01-02 GREEN 7
2012-01-02 BLUE 4
2012-01-02 RED 8
2012-01-02 YELLOW 5

if order is not an issue:

sort -k1,2 -k3nr file | sort -uk1,2 
2012-01-02 BLUE 4
2012-01-02 GREEN 7
2012-01-02 RED 8
2012-01-02 YELLOW 5
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Had similar idea using arrays

awk '{i=$1" "$2;if($3>c[i]){c[i]=$3}}END{for(a in c){print a,c[a]}}' colors.txt
2012-01-02 RED 8
2012-01-02 YELLOW 5
2012-01-02 GREEN 7
2012-01-02 BLUE 4

and a perl one

perl -lne '/^(.*)(\d+)$/;$x{$1}=$2 if $2>$x{$1};END{for(sort keys %x){print $_,$x{$_}}}' colors.txt
2012-01-02 BLUE 4
2012-01-02 GREEN 7
2012-01-02 RED 8
2012-01-02 YELLOW 5
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