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map<string,string>::find seems to be returning garbage iterator, since i can access neither my_it->first nor second (NB: my_it != my_map.end() is verified). VC2010 reports a debug error, and looking deeper reveals

my_it is (Bad Ptr, Bad Ptr).

The 'offending' map is a class attribute, _match, shown below in context:

class NicePCREMatch
{
private:
    map<string, string, less<string> > _match;

public:
    void addGroup(const string& group_name, const string& value);
    string group(const string& group_name);
};

Here is the code that returns elements by key (the commented-out code works fine):

string NicePCREMatch::group(const string& group_name)
{
    /*for (map<string, string, less<string> >::iterator j = _match.begin(); j != _match.end(); j++)
    {
        if(!strcmp(j->first.c_str(), group_name.c_str()))
        {
            return j->second;
        }
    }

    throw runtime_error("runtime_error: no such group");*/

    map<string, string, less<string> >::iterator i = _match.find(group_name);

    if (i == _match.end())
    {
        throw runtime_error("runtime_error: no such group");
    }

    return i->second;
}

And Here is the code that inserts new elements in the map:

void NicePCREMatch::addGroup(const string& group_name, const string& value)
{
    _match.insert(pair<string, string>(group_name, value));
}

Another class uses NicePCREMatch as follows:

template<class Match_t>
vector<Match_t> NicePCRE<Match_t>::match(const string& buf)
{
[snip]
    Match_t m;
[snip]
    m.addGroup(std::string((const char *)tabptr + 2, name_entry_size - 3), \
                buf.substr(ovector[2*n], ovector[2*n+1] - ovector[2*n]));
[snip]
    addMatch(m);
[snip]
    return _matches;
}

Where,

template<class Match_t>
void NicePCRE<Match_t>::addMatch(const Match_t& m) 
{ 
    _matches.push_back(m);
}

Finally, client code uses NicePCRE class as follows:

void test_NicePCRE_email_match(void)
{
    NicePCRE<> npcre;
    npcre.compile("(?P<username>[a-zA-Z]+?)(?:%40|@)(?P<domain>[a-zA-Z]+\.[a-zA-Z]{2,6})");
    vector<NicePCREMatch> matches = npcre.match("toto@yahoo.com");
    assert(!matches.empty());
    assert(!strcmp(matches.begin()->group("username").c_str(), "toto"));
    cout << matches.begin()->group("domain").c_str() << endl;
    assert(!strcmp(matches.begin()->group("domain").c_str(), "yahoo.com"));
}

BTW, this --is pretty much-- my main (the oddest TDD ever :) ):

int main()
{
    int test_cnt = 0;
    cout << "Running test #" << test_cnt << " .." << endl;
    test_NicePCRE_email_match();
    cout << "OK." << endl << endl;
    test_cnt++;

    SleepEx(5000, 1);

    return 0;
}

What am I doing wrong here?

EDIT: The following modification (compare with the version above) solved my problem. Viz,

void NicePCREMatch::addGroup(const string& group_name, const string& value)
{
    _match.insert(pair<string, string>(group_name.c_str(), value.c_str()));
}

Client code (slightly modified) now looks like this:

void test_NicePCRE_email_match(void)
{
    NicePCRE<> npcre;
    npcre.compile("(?P<username>[a-zA-Z]+?)(?:%40|@)(?P<domain>[a-zA-Z]+\.[a-zA-Z]{2,6})");
    vector<NicePCREMatch> matches = npcre.match("toto@yahoo.com");
    assert(!matches.empty());
    try
    {
        assert(!strcmp(matches.begin()->group("username").c_str(), "toto"));
        assert(!strcmp(matches.begin()->group("domain").c_str(), "yahoo.com"));
        cout << "username = " << matches.begin()->group("username") << endl;
        cout << "domain = " << matches.begin()->group("domain") << endl;
    }
    catch (const runtime_error& e)
    {
        cout << "Caught: " << e.what() << endl;
        assert(0x0);
    }
}

This is quite bizarre. Can someone please explain. However, I consider my problem solved already.

Thanks every one.

share|improve this question
    
Is it possible that _match is concurrently modified by another thread? This kind of error could also be cause by memory-corruption elsewhere in your thread. –  Björn Pollex Feb 22 '12 at 10:46
    
Thanks for acting Bjorn Pollex. No, the _match map is accessed only by a single thread. BTW, if it were due to memory-corruption by other thread (or some other thread-unsafety stuff), how do I explain that the commented-out code works but no the one with the map::find call?). –  dohmatob Feb 22 '12 at 11:00
    
what's the need of comparison specification (less<string>) in map<string, string, less<string> >? –  Andy T Feb 22 '12 at 11:01
    
No need --yet. But I don't see the offence it might cause. Or is there? –  dohmatob Feb 22 '12 at 11:03
1  
Create test project with problem class, test it and attach here if problem appears. I have no errors with similar code (copy-paste your class and implement main). –  Torsten Feb 22 '12 at 11:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your issue is here

if (i == _match.end())
{
    throw runtime_error("runtime_error: no such group");
}

return i->second;

Your find failed for some reason. I can't say why because I don't have the full code. But, after the failure, you are throwing an error, but there is nobody to catch outside. Please add a try catch at the point where you call the method group() and implement the logic if the match is not found. I tried with your sample snippets (+ some changes to get the stuff compiled) and it looks like visual studio continues with the next line in the function even after a throw statement. I don't know the theory behind it. I was bit surprised at seeing such a behavior.

[To make sure that your class structure is not causing the problem, I tried with a simple global method and even the method also gave me the same behavior. If there are somebody who can explain this please feel free.]

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Unni. - Indeed runtime_error("runtime_error: no such group") was been thrown in class method string NicePCREMatch::group but no been caught in my void test_NicePCRE_email_match 'test case'. But, for some strange reason VS2010 was not reporting the runtime_error as such (It would give me the misleading Bad Ptr error stuff). I try-catch logic in void test_NicePCRE_email_match and caught runtime_error("runtime_error: no such group"). - I'm confident in my (not shown) vector<Match_t> NicePCRE<Match_t>::match heuristic, so why does the find(..) fail? The answer's in my edit. Thanks –  dohmatob Feb 22 '12 at 15:42
    
Are you saying that, after changing "_match.insert(pair<string, string>(group_name.c_str(), value.c_str()));" the find started giving a valid iterator? –  PermanentGuest Feb 22 '12 at 15:58
    
Thanks once more @Unni. BTW, did someone down-click/vote you? Why? Or am I missing something here? In case yes, how I wish I had sufficient reputation to revoke that right away :) . –  dohmatob Feb 22 '12 at 16:00
    
never mind, life is like that :-) you can accept as answer ;-) –  PermanentGuest Feb 22 '12 at 16:01
    
Yes, after changing _match.insert(pair<string, string>(group_name, value) to _match.insert(pair<string, string>(group_name.c_str(), value.c_str())) the find started giving a valid iterator. –  dohmatob Feb 22 '12 at 16:09

This might be caused by three things - either you modify the map in some way after the execution of find or you have a memory coruption somewhere in your program or the debugger is simply not showing the correct values for the iterator.

Try using debug output - if the code crashes when you try to output the values, then probably the iterator is really broken.

Also make sure you do not modify the map after the execution of find. If you do, this may make the iterator invalid and so you need to move the find call immedietly before using the iterator.

If both of the above options don't help you probably have memory corruption somewhere and you need to find it. Maybe use valgrind for that. Please note this should be your last resort only when the two other options are proved impossible.

share|improve this answer
4  
valgrind should not be your "last resort". Far from it. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 22 '12 at 11:11
    
I meant that it requires a lot of effort to run, not that it will not do the job. Checking if we have case 1 or case 2 will take way less time and that is why I said you one should use valgrind only once he have ruled out the other options. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Feb 22 '12 at 11:28
    
That's nonsense. $ valgrind myApp is really very easy to type, and you should be doing it as a matter of course in your development process anyway; it's far more efficient and effective than spending half a day scattering debug lines throughout your code and then the evening analysing their output. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 22 '12 at 11:38
    
Apparantly our experience in using valgrind is quite different. If you develop a huge application that usually takes about 10 mins to load and requires 30 GB of RAM starting valgrind is not "just typing valgrind myApp", but requires a few hours. In the meantime adding debug output if you have good enough knowledge of where and how can save you that time. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Feb 22 '12 at 12:03
    
Something is very, very wrong if that's the case. Does your application require a Cray supercomputer? Even if it does, the OP's most certainly does not. A typical valgrind run is a ten-second launch and a coffee break whilst you wait for results. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 22 '12 at 12:17

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