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How do I execute some JavaScript that is a string?

function ExecuteJavascriptString()
{
    var s = "alert('hello')";
    // how do I get a browser to alert('hello')?
}
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10 Answers 10

up vote 36 down vote accepted

With eval("my script here") function.

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5  
the link is broken. –  Hernán Eche Jan 22 at 20:07

The eval function will evaluate a string that is passed to it.

But the use of eval can be dangerous, so use with caution.

Edit: annakata has a good point -- Not only is eval dangerous, it is slow. This is because the code to be evaluated must be parsed on the spot, so that will take some computing resources.

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11  
super dangerous AND slow - you should bold, italic, underline, and h1 that –  annakata Jun 2 '09 at 13:00
3  
I'm doubtful that it's any slower than loading JavaScript anywhere else on the page, that has to be parsed as well. If it's slower, it it's because it's done in a different scope, which might force to creation of resources for that scope. –  altCognito Jun 2 '09 at 13:16
1  
If you say eval() is dangerous. Is there any alternative? –  white_gecko May 22 '12 at 15:36
    
@white_gecko It depends on what needs to be accomplished. The "eval can be dangerous" link has a few concrete cases where an alternative to eval is available. One thing that is certain is that running eval on a user-provided string is a serious security issue. –  coobird May 22 '12 at 15:43

You can execute it using a function. Example:

var theInstructions = "alert('Hello World'); var x = 100";

var F=new Function (theInstructions);

return(F());
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1  
but in the end - isn't that the same as calling var F=function(){eval(theInstructions);};? –  Jörn Berkefeld Feb 12 at 18:08

Use eval().

W3 Schools tour of eval. Site has some usable examples of eval.

You will probably get a lot of warnings about using this safely. do NOT allow users to inject ANYTHING into eval() as it is a huge security issue.

You'll also want to know that eval() has a different scope.

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6  
w3fools.com. The W3C doesn't even have anything to say about eval. If you want to link to something official, target ecma-international.org/ecma-262/5.1/#sec-15.1.2.1 –  Bergi Aug 5 '13 at 15:34
1  
I didn't want to "link to anything official, I wanted to link to something readable - Looking at what you linked, it gives no explanation of how it is used, no examples, no way to tinker, and describes the method in isolation. For a beginner, it is a completely inappropriate link. Hey, you wouldn't happen to be @bjorninge, would you? –  altCognito Aug 14 '13 at 21:56
    
The spec describes eval better to me than that W3Schools article. Something readable with good explanation and examples would be developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/…. And no, I'm not bjorninge –  Bergi Aug 15 '13 at 9:36
    
I will agree that it's not documentation, and I will agree that mozilla's page is a better overall picture of it. Slightly tweaked my answer based on feedback –  altCognito Aug 15 '13 at 17:14

Try this:

  var script = "<script type=\"text/javascript\"> content </script>";
  //using jquery next
  $('body').append(script);//incorporates and executes inmediatelly

Personally I didnt test it, but seems to work.

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Use eval as below. Eval should be used with caution, a simple search about "eval is evil" should throw some pointers.

function ExecuteJavascriptString()
{
    var s = "alert('hello')";
    eval(s);
}
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1  
Good tip on that a simple search about "eval is evil" Thanks! –  Electric Automation Jun 2 '09 at 13:27
eval(s);

But this can be dangerous if you are taking data from users, although I suppose if they crash their own browser thats their problem.

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1  
exactly. Eval is dangerous on the server side. On the client... not so much. The user could just type in javascript:someevilcode in to the address of the browser and boom. Eval right there. –  Esben Skov Pedersen Jan 29 '10 at 9:28

eval should do it.

eval(s);
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eval(s);

Remember though, that eval is very powerful and quite unsafe. You better be confident that the script you are executing is safe and unmutable by users.

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1  
In JS everything can be changed by the user just type "javascript:document.write("Hello World");" into almost any browser's address bar. –  UnkwnTech Jun 2 '09 at 12:58
1  
Yes, but you can make it harder for him by not using global variables, hiding your functions in closures etc. Also, by avoiding eval like the plague =) –  PatrikAkerstrand Jun 2 '09 at 13:05

If you want to execute a specific command (that is string) after a specific time

function ExecStr(cmd, InterVal) {
    try {
        setTimeout(function () {
            var F = new Function(cmd);
            return (F());
        }, InterVal);
    } catch (e) { }
}
window.ExecStr = ExecStr;
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please do explain –  Steel Brain Oct 8 at 9:43

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