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When receiving an incoming msessage I receive a correct result when my packet structure has a fixed size array in it, like this

typedef struct inPacket{
    int cmd;
    int seqNo;
    int numbers[100];
} inPacket;

then I call recv like so

char buf[1024];
recv(m_socket, buf, sizeof(buf));

and cast the char array to the packet type

inPacket* p = (inPacket*)buf;

This works fine, I have a full array of ints in the 'numbers' field after casting. I cant think why the below doesnt work, when passing in an address at which I want to store the numbers

void func(int* out)
{
    inPacket inpacket;
    inPacket.numbers = out;
    recv(m_socket, (char*)&inpacket, sizeof(inPacket));
}

the 'numbers' array is a bad pointer after the call to recv.

The array passed in is allocated by the calling function

int numbers[10];
func(numbers);
share|improve this question
1  
That can't be the real code. inPacket.numbers = out would trigger an error. – cnicutar Feb 22 '12 at 11:10
up vote 2 down vote accepted

What recv does is, it copies data from an internal buffer into the one you supply. So it overwrites the contents of your structure. You also change the array member to some other pointer, which is a no-no. And not only that, you try to set it to an array that is smaller than the existing array, which can lead to recv possibly overwrite memory outside your new array.

You need to do something like this:

void func(int* out, int maxnum)
{
    inPacket inpacket;
    recv(m_socket, (char*)&inpacket, sizeof(inPacket));

    memcpy(out, inpacket.numbers, sizeof(int) * maxnum);
}

Then you call the function like this:

int numbers[10];
func(numbers, 10);

Edit: If a dynamic array is wanted, then the call to recv have to be modified, along with the structure:

typedef struct inPacket{
    int cmd;
    int seqNo;
    int numbers[0];
} inPacket;

void func(int* out, int maxnum)
{
    size_t packetSize = sizeof(inPacket) + sizeof(int) * maxnum;
    inPacket *inpacket = malloc(packetSize);

    recv(m_socket, inpacket, packetSize);

    memcpy(out, inpacket->numbers, sizeof(int) * maxnum);

    free(inpacket);
}
share|improve this answer
    
in this case wouldn't I still need a fixed size array of numbers in the packet struct? – Bill Walton Feb 22 '12 at 11:16
    
@BillWalton Updated my answer. – Joachim Pileborg Feb 22 '12 at 11:23
    
When the function exits I now get a run time check failure- Stack around the variable 'inPacket' was corrupted. Can you explain the purpose of a zero sized array? I don't quite understand how this is supposed to work – Bill Walton Feb 22 '12 at 11:27
    
@BillWalton Yes it should. I edited again, should work better now. – Joachim Pileborg Feb 22 '12 at 11:37
    
Thatks Joachim that works, but it allocates the buffer inside of the function, what I wanted, and I'm not sure if it's possible, is to use the memory passed in as part of the packet. The functions doing network comms need to be very fast and let the calling function do the allocation. – Bill Walton Feb 22 '12 at 11:56

My guess is that recv takes the size of the buffer, and tries to fill it. But the size of a pointer is just an int, so it probably just read a few (4?) bytes and slam them in the buffer. For variable-sized socket messages one usually has to use some structure that knows how many bytes the message to receive will have (like prepending the message with an int which is the size of the rest of the message, then allocating the buffer accordingly and call recv again with the new buffer)

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