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I want to rename all the files in a folder which starts with 123_xxx.txt to xxx.txt

for ex: my directory has:

123_xxx.txt
123_yyy.txt
123_zzz.txt

now I want to rename all files as:

xxx.txt
yyy.txt
zzz.txt

I have seen some useful bash scripts in this forum but m still confused to use it for my requirement.

Let us suppose I use below:

for file in `find -name '123_*.txt'` ; do mv $file {?.txt} ; done

I am right now dumb what to use at ? here. Please help.

Thanks in advance.

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6 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Do it this way:

find . -name '123*.txt' -type f -exec bash -c 'mv "$1" "${1/\/123_//}"' -- {} \;

Advantages:

  • No pipes, no reads, no chance of breaking on malformed filenames.
  • Only one non-standard tool or feature: bash.
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find -name "123*.txt" -exec rename 's/^123_//' {} ";" 

will do it. No AWK, no for, no xargs needed, but rename, a very useful command from the Perl lib, not always included with Linux, but for instance easy to install from the repos.

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This is superior to the overkill awk and looping answers above for those people who have the perl rename. –  Sorpigal Feb 22 '12 at 12:48
    
You're right, I should make a note (and did so). –  user unknown Feb 22 '12 at 13:25
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you could check 'rename' tool

for example

rename 's/^123_//' *.txt

or (gawk is needed)

find . -name '123_*.txt'|awk '{print "mv "$0" "gensub(/\/123_(.*\.txt)$/,"/\\1","g");}'|sh

test:

kent$  tree
.
|-- 123_a.txt
|-- 123_b.txt
|-- 123_c.txt
|-- 123_d.txt
|-- 123_e.txt
`-- u
    |-- 123_a.txt
    |-- 123_b.txt
    |-- 123_c.txt
    |-- 123_d.txt
    `-- 123_e.txt

1 directory, 10 files

kent$  find . -name '123_*.txt'|awk '{print "mv "$0" "gensub(/\/123_(.*\.txt)$/,"/\\1","g");}'|sh

kent$  tree
.
|-- a.txt
|-- b.txt
|-- c.txt
|-- d.txt
|-- e.txt
`-- u
    |-- a.txt
    |-- b.txt
    |-- c.txt
    |-- d.txt
    `-- e.txt

1 directory, 10 files
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You should mention the homonym trap: you talk about special rename command that usurps the name of rename from util-linux (which does not deal with regular expressions). –  daxim Feb 22 '12 at 11:35
    
Thanks a lot for the help. gawk worked perfectly fine.. –  user1225606 Feb 22 '12 at 11:39
    
The rename example isn't recursive. The find example is, but it needlessly doesn't use rename for renaming. And it pipes a generated script to sh, which is icky. –  Sorpigal Feb 22 '12 at 12:28
    
Thanks, is it possible for me to modify the filename to all lower cases after the rename? i mean.. any Xxx.txt should be xxx.txt finally? –  user1225606 Feb 23 '12 at 5:00
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A slight variation on Kent's that doesn't require gawk and is a little bit more readable, (although, thats debatable..)

find . -name "123*" | awk '{a=$1; gsub(/123_/,""); printf "mv \"%s\" \"%s\"\n", a, $1}' | sh

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This was the only one that actually worked for me out the box on FreeNAS. –  deed02392 Sep 14 '13 at 23:12
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find -name '123_*.txt' | while read file; do mv "$file" "${file#123_}"; done
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prename s/^123_// 123_*

See prename in the official Perl5 wiki.

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premane is not recognized in my bash shell as well as command prompt. FYI, m having perl installed... –  user1225606 Feb 22 '12 at 11:16
1  
It helps to spell the command correctly. Read the document I linked to where to get it. –  daxim Feb 22 '12 at 11:30
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