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Could you please advice or provide any solution ,how to solve the below problem:

order table:

order id   order_name  order_date
1          pizza       20-feb-2012
2          burger      17-feb-2012

order_state table

order_id     order_state     order_state_date          order_state_time
1             initiated      20-feb-2012               12:29:11:203
1             processed      21-feb-2012               12:29:12:112
1             cancelled      21-feb-2012               12:29:11:311
2             initiated      17-feb-2012               12:11:10:201
2             processed      18-feb-2012               12:01:01:301
2             cancelled      19-feb-2012               12:29:59:300 

if i query on monday ,i have to check last 3 days i.e friday,saturday and sunday.So that i able to fetch second record,if i query today ,i able to fetch first recrod ,in both cases cancelled record i should able to fetch based on data and time.

Below Sql gives the system date and time based on day:

select decode(TRIM(to_char(SYSDATE,'Day')),'Monday','3','1') from dual

Result,if i query on monday at 12:30 P.M or 12:29:59:299

order_id   order_state    order_name  order_state_date   order_state_time

2          canceled       burger      19-feb-2012         12:29:59:300

Result,if i query today at 12:29:10:311 P.M

order_id   order_state    order_name  order_state_date   order_state_time

    1          canceled       pizza      21-feb-2012         12:29:59:300

Thanks,

Chaitu

share|improve this question
    
What are the expected results of your query ? – A.B.Cade Feb 22 '12 at 12:19
    
question updated,added expected result – user569125 Feb 22 '12 at 12:28
    
Don't create duplicates - please see the FAQ. If you don't get suitable answers, improve the original question to explain what you need. – Alex Poole Feb 22 '12 at 13:58

It's hard to follow exactly what you're after, and your data and results seem to be contradictory in places; I think you want to use analytic functions to pull the latest state of each order, but only if the last change to the order was in the last three days - down to millisecond precision?

Using CTEs to generate your sample data:

with orders as (
select 1 as order_id, 'pizza' as order_name, '20-feb-2012' as order_date
    from dual
union all select 2, 'burger', '17-feb-2012' from dual
),
order_state as (
select 1 as order_id, 'initiated' as order_state, '20-feb-2012' as
    order_state_date, '12:29:11:203' as order_state_time from dual
union all select 1, 'processed', '21-feb-2012', '12:29:12:112' from dual
union all select 1, 'cancelled', '21-feb-2012', '12:29:11:311' from dual
union all select 2, 'initiated', '17-feb-2012', '12:11:10:201' from dual
union all select 2, 'processed', '18-feb-2012', '12:01:01:301' from dual
union all select 2, 'cancelled', '19-feb-2012', '12:29:59:300' from dual
)
-- actual query starts here
select order_id, order_state, order_state_date, order_state_time
from (
    select o.order_id,
        first_value(os.order_state)
            over (partition by os.order_id
                order by os.order_state_timestamp desc) as order_state,
        to_char(max(os.order_state_timestamp) over (partition by os.order_id),
            'DD-mon-YYYY') as order_state_date,
        to_char(max(os.order_state_timestamp) over (partition by os.order_id),
            'HH24:MI:SS:FF3') as order_state_time,
        max(os.order_state_timestamp) over (partition by os.order_id)
            as last_order_state_timestamp,
        row_number() over (partition by os.order_id order by os.order_id) as rn
    from orders o
    join (select order_id, order_state,
        to_timestamp(order_state_date ||' '|| order_state_time,
            'DD-mon-YYYY HH24:MI:SS:FF3') as order_state_timestamp
        from order_state) os
    on os.order_id = o.order_id
)
where rn = 1
and last_order_state_timestamp > systimestamp - interval '3' day;

  ORDER_ID ORDER_STA ORDER_STATE_DATE     ORDER_STATE_TIME
---------- --------- -------------------- ------------------
         1 processed 21-feb-2012          12:29:12:112

Your expected results have cancelled, but the date/time values for the states look the wrong way round.

If you want to show orders created in the last three days, not just those updated, then you'll need to get the min() instead of max() timestamp and filter on that.


You don't seem to be interested in fixing the model to use proper date/timestamp column types, so this is apparently not relevant...

Storing the date and time in separate fields is making this much harder than it needs to be, and I can't think of any valid reason to do that. If it's only done because a DATE field doesn't hold milliseconds, then use a TIMESTAMP field instead. I've tried to minimise the pain by converting it on the fly in the subquery, but it's still not a good model. If you had a single order_state_timestamp field instead of the separate date/time fields, the query could be something like:

select order_id, order_state,
    to_char(last_order_state_timestamp, 'DD-mon-YYYY HH24:MI:SS:FF3')
    as order_state_timestamp
from (
    select o.order_id,
        first_value(os.order_state)
            over (partition by os.order_id
                order by os.order_state_timestamp desc) as order_state,
        max(os.order_state_timestamp) over (partition by os.order_id)
            as last_order_state_timestamp,
        row_number() over (partition by os.order_id order by os.order_id) as rn
    from orders o
    join order_state os on os.order_id = o.order_id
)
where rn = 1
and last_order_state_timestamp > systimestamp - interval '3' day;

which is slightly less unpleasant.


Edit: Based on a comment on your previous/duplicate question, you want the number of days you look back to vary depending on the current day. That isn't at all obvious from either question. You can do that with:

and last_order_state_timestamp > systimestamp
    - numtodsinterval(decode(to_char(sysdate, 'D'), '1', 3, 1), 'DAY');

But you need to be careful with your NLS settings; the result of to_char(sysdate, 'D') is 1 on Monday here, but may be 0 or something else where you are. See this, particularly the comment against the D element.

share|improve this answer
    
what is last_order_state_timestamp?.could you please simplify the answer. – user569125 Feb 22 '12 at 14:35
    
In the first query it's a temporary column formed in the subquery, to make it easier to do the ordering in the analytic functions. In the second I'm hoping you're changed the model so your order_state table has columns order_id, order_state, order_state_timestamp instead of separate date and time columns. If the answer doesn't help you, amend your question to clarify what you need. – Alex Poole Feb 22 '12 at 14:50
    
model not changed,still they are seperate columns – user569125 Feb 22 '12 at 15:00
    
even your first query not giving proper result,it should give this record 1, 'cancelled', '21-feb-2012', '12:29:11:311'.because if you see 311 micro seconds is the latest record – user569125 Feb 22 '12 at 19:52
    
@user569125 - no, because the time in your third record, 12:29:**11:311**, is earlier than your second, 12:29:**12:112**. I said in the answer that your data looked wrong; the cancelled is before the processed. – Alex Poole Feb 22 '12 at 21:44

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