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I have a structure which should have the same shape (at least same size, offsets will come with it I think) for 32 and 64 bits machines.

Our struct is an obfuscated type, the size is generated at build time, and we can't know if this type will be used on 32 ou 64 bit arch.

What is the best practice to do that? Do you have pointers of project doing so?

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1  
Which compiler(s) are you using? on what platforms? –  Hasturkun Feb 22 '12 at 12:29
    
What is an obfuscated type ? Do you mean an opaque type ? Why does it have to be the same size ? –  cnicutar Feb 22 '12 at 12:30
    
Why don't you use data types with fixed size like int32_t and other from the stdint.h header? –  mikithskegg Feb 22 '12 at 12:49
1  
If the struct contains pointers then they will be 4 bytes on 32bit but 8 bytes on 64bit. You could perhaps pad the struct for 32bit and use a conditional preprocessor directive. –  foo Feb 22 '12 at 12:52
    
@Hasturkun: gcc, x86[_64] –  Jérôme Feb 22 '12 at 13:00

2 Answers 2

If I understand correctly you want to generate a struct which should have exactly the same layout on a 32-bit as on a 64-bit system.

E.g. suppose that you would generate this struct:

struct S
   {
   long l;
   char *s;
   int i;
   long l2;
   };

Then this will have a different layout on 64-bit as on 32-bit (the char-pointer will have a different size in this case). If you would compile this on an old DOS system, then int would be 16-bit instead of 32-bit and you would have again a different layout.

The best way to tackle this is to define your own types, and use these in your structure, like this:

typedef long  MY_INT4;
typedef short MY_INT2;

Then use these types in your struct. If you ever need to port to a different system, you only need to review your typedefs.

struct S
   {
   MY_INT4 m1;
   MY_INT2 m2;
   };

For some types (like for pointers), this trick doesn't work since there is no built-in type for 32-bit or for 64-bit pointers, all pointers are alike (if we forget about the old DOS far- and near-pointers).

For those types, you could use macro's. E.g. this:

struct S
   {
   MY_INT4 m1;
   MY_INT2 m2;
   MY_POINTER(char,m3);
   };

Then for 64-bit systems you only need to define MY_POINTER like this:

#define MY_POINTER(t,m) t *m

For 32-bit systems you can define it like this:

#define MY_POINTER(t,m) t *m; t *dummy

So for 32-bit systems we add 2 pointer-fields instead of 1.

The problem with this last approach is that when you have 2 pointers, these macro's will generate 2 members with the same name.

You can solve this problem by using an unnamed union. Define your macro like this:

#define MY_POINTER(t,m) t *m; union {t *dummy;}

Notice that with this solution I ignored the problem of byte-ordering. If you want to solve that you need to dive deeper.

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2  
A long is not guaranteed to be 4 bytes, it's better to use types like int32_t from stdint.h then. –  foo Feb 22 '12 at 13:14
    
I agree. That's why I said to use your own typedefs instead of relying on types like long, short, int. Indeed, int32_t is safer than using long. –  Patrick Feb 23 '12 at 8:19

I have a structure which should have the same shape (at least same size, offsets will come with it I think) for 32 and 64 bits machines.

Technically possible, but not used in practice.

Our struct is an obfuscated type, the size is generated at build time, and we can't know if this type will be used on 32 ou 64 bit arch. What is the best practice to do that? Do you have pointers of project doing so

Standard way of dealing with this issue is to have the same header file for both 32- and 64-bit platforms and have two builds of your library. A 32-bit client of your header links against a 32-bit library, same goes for 64.

If eventually an object of a 32-bit structure needs to get into a 64-bit code (or vice versa) there is must be a piece of code that does the conversion. This is how 32-bit glibc works on a 64-bit kernel.

A simple slow way of doing the conversion is to serialize in text and deserialize back.

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