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I have to turn back to (embedded) C after some lengthy time with C++, and have the following problem:

I have a source module which is included a lot of times, let's call it utilities.h and utilities.c In it, I have an important array, let's call it

#define IMPORTANT_ARRAY_LENGTH  10000
char important_array[IMPORTANT_ARRAY_LENGTH];

I have a lot of other functions in this utilities module, and they all work fine. However, in one of the other source files, let's call it worker.c, I have to use this array. What is the "official", elegant way to do this, without having to put extern char important_array[IMPORTANT_ARRAY_LENGTH] and the macro definition in the worker.c ?

If I do the following:

utilities.h

#ifndef _UTILITIES_H_
#define _UTILITIES_H_

#define IMPORTANT_ARRAY_LENGTH  10000
extern char important_array[IMPORTANT_ARRAY_LENGTH];

// ...

utilities.c

#ifndef _UTILITIES_C_
#define _UTILITIES_C_

#include "utilities.h"

char important_array[IMPORTANT_ARRAY_LENGTH];

// ...

worker.c

#include "utilities.h"
// ...
important_array[0] = 0;

then my array will be an undefined symbol in worker.c. If I don't use the extern keyword in utilities.h, then of course, it's a duplicate symbol. (Strangely, it compiles with just a warning, and I can see from the linker file that the size is allocated multiple times.)

Do I really have to declare my array in worker.c? I want to keep everything clean, and have all declarations in one place only: in a header file. And I want to have the macro definition only once (this is secondary, because I could use a const, but I want the preprocessor to handle it, and not take up place)

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declare it in utilities.h. If the compiler complain about "undefined symbol", you have another problem. How do you compile it? –  asaelr Feb 22 '12 at 12:59
    
I do declare it in utilities.h. My question is about worker.c. –  vsz Feb 22 '12 at 13:23
1  
BTW: don't use leading underscores in preprocessor symbols, unless you are part of the implementation. –  wildplasser Feb 22 '12 at 13:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What you have is the canonical way to do it: have an extern declaration in the header file, and define the variable in the .c file.

my array will be an undefined symbol in worker.c

No, it won't. Your code will compile and link just fine.

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This was not the question. As you can see I already did it like this. The question was about how to use it in another translation unit. –  vsz Feb 22 '12 at 13:30
    
@vsz: You just go ahead and use it; there's nothing further to be done. I've updated the answer. –  NPE Feb 22 '12 at 13:32
1  
@vzs Well, your question was about the most elegant way to do it. With this approach, you just #include the header file. As that's not working for you, you're doing something wrong somewhere else, or your compiler is broken. –  nos Feb 22 '12 at 13:34
    
I use it exactly as it's in the example. Do you mean it is syntactically correct, and I'll have to fiddle with the project settings? –  vsz Feb 22 '12 at 13:34
1  
@vsz: You have to link utilities.c into your executable. Beyond that, no special "fiddling of project settings" is required. –  NPE Feb 22 '12 at 13:36

Having one declaration (extern...) in each translation unit and exactly one definition is the most elegant way to do this.

So leave the extern char important_array in the header and char important_array in one of the .c files.

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I know, but this does not answer my question. Do I have to put extern char important_array in all the .c files which include the headers? –  vsz Feb 22 '12 at 13:21
    
@vsz It does answer your question. declaration in the header, definition in one .c file. Read the second line again ? –  cnicutar Feb 22 '12 at 13:22
    
@cnicutar: appearantly, it doesn't. In the example I wrote, I have the declaration in the header, the definition in the .c file, and I include the header in translation unit where I want to use it, but I still get the undefined symbol error, although I include the header. This header is included in other units as well, so it might be that in this translation unit (worker.c in my example) it is already jumped out because of the #define UTILITIES_H –  vsz Feb 22 '12 at 13:28
    
@vsz Sounds like a linker error - show us how you're linking it. Also, what's with the #ifndef _UTILITIES_C_ stuff ? –  cnicutar Feb 22 '12 at 13:29

I often put the definition in the header (this is frowned upon, I know). It keeps the definition and declaration close together, which is a Good Thing.

/* file.c */
#define FILE_C 1
#include "file.h"

.

/* file.h */
#ifndef FILE_H
#define FILE_H 1

#define BIG_SIZE 13

#if FILE_C 
char the_array[BIG_SIZE];
#else
extern char the_array[BIG_SIZE];
#endif

#endif /* FlLE_H */

.

 /* other_file.c */
#include "file.h"

There is no risk of doing it wrong: the linker will complain if you do it wrong.

BTW a similar way to basically do the same, but maybe a bit more readable, is:

/* file.h */
#ifndef FILE_H
#define FILE_H 1

#if FILE_C
#define EXTERN /**/
#else
#define EXTERN extern
#endif

#define BIG_SIZE 13

EXTERN char the_array[BIG_SIZE];

...

#undef EXTERN
#endif /* FlLE_H */
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You could use a macro name like AND_ALSO_DEFINE_STUFF (or words to that effect) rather than FILE_C. Just so that file.c is explicitly telling the header to provide definitions, rather than making it look like file.h is the one that knows what .c file they should be in. –  Steve Jessop Feb 22 '12 at 14:02
    
That's also a possibility, it's only a name. ALSO_DIFINE stuff is not a very discriptive name. I'd prefer DO_DEFINE_THE_BIG_ARRAY. But what if there is more than one item defined in the .h file? The FILE_C macro name directly indicates where it is supposed to be defined, which again is a Good Thing. YMMV. –  wildplasser Feb 22 '12 at 14:12

Create a new function at utilities.c called something like "get_important_array" that just returns a pointer to array and put the prototype at utilities.h. After that, when you put the utilities.h at worker.c you'll have important_array access in a simple, and organized way.

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