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I have a requirement to run a transform on a xml file. it is going to be very basic, but having never done any xslt work before I'm a bit lost. i've had a very of a lot of SO Q&A's but have not been able to work it out?

What I require is my xml file has a schema reference and I need to change it to a different schema reference.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<Schedule xmlns="http://www.xxx.com/12022012/schedule/v2" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.xxx.com/12022012/schedule/v2 ../Schema/Schema_v2.xsd">
  <Interface_Header>
  </Interface_Header>
...
</Schedule>

I just want to alter the V2's to V3's, and keep the remainder of the file intact? It sounds very simple, but I cannot seem to figure this out? I tried a simple xslt here:-

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
  <xsl:copy>
   <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
  </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

but using this outputs all my values without any xml tags.

thanks in adv.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Use:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
                xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
                xmlns:ns="new_namespace">
    <xsl:output method="xml" indent="yes"/>

    <xsl:template match="@xsi:schemaLocation">
        <xsl:attribute name="xsi:schemaLocation">
            <xsl:text>new_schema_location</xsl:text>
        </xsl:attribute>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="node() | @*">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="node() | @*"/>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="*">
        <xsl:element name="{local-name()}" namespace="ns">
            <xsl:apply-templates select="node() | @*"/>
        </xsl:element>
    </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

applied to provided XML produces

<Schedule xsi:schemaLocation="new_schema_location" xmlns="ns" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
    <Interface_Header>
    </Interface_Header>
    ...
</Schedule>
share|improve this answer
    
That's great thanks. I had some trouble understanding the xmlns:ns="new_namespace" xmlns="ns" piece but I changed the value at <xsl:element name="{local-name()}" namespace="ns"> and this worked for me. will have to do some more reading on this subject me thinks. anyway thanks a lot. –  Purplemonkey Feb 22 '12 at 17:12
    
@Purplemonkey, Welcome. –  Kirill Polishchuk Feb 22 '12 at 17:14

When you don't need the new schema location to have xsi namespace, then the following will work:

<xsl:output indent="yes" method="xml"/>

<xsl:template match="/">
    <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="node()|@*">
    <xsl:copy>
        <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
    </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="@*[local-name() = 'schemaLocation']">
    <xsl:attribute name="schemaLocation">newSchemaLocation</xsl:attribute>
</xsl:template>

When you do need to use the xsi namespace again, then of course it needs to be mentioned in the templates and thus has to be declared in the stylesheet header, as follows, where as a demonstration also the local-name() function is replaced by the name() function; the former includes namespace where the latter doesn't:

<xsl:stylesheet 
    version="1.0"
    xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
    xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">

...

    <xsl:template match="@*[name() = 'xsi:schemaLocation']">
        <xsl:attribute name="xsi:schemaLocation">newSchemaLocation</xsl:attribute>
    </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

Note that both solutions rely on specific template paths (@*[local-name()=...]) to have a higher priority than less specific ones (@*).

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