Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We can use pair sequences to create heterogenous lists in Haskell:

type a *: b = (a, b)
a *: b = (a, b)
infixr 5 *:

hlist :: Int *: String *: Maybe Float *: ()
hlist = 1 *: "hello" *: Just 3 *: () -- (1, ("hello", (Just 3, ())))

Is there a way we can do type-level filtering on these lists? That is, define some polymorphic function hfilter such that for distinct types a, b, and c:

hfilter :: a *: b *: c *: a *: b *: a *: () ->  a *: a *: a *: ()
hfilter :: a *: b *: c *: a *: b *: a *: () ->  b *: b *: ()
hfilter :: a *: b *: c *: a *: b *: a *: () ->  c *: ()
hfilter :: a *: b *: c *: a *: b *: a *: () ->  ()
share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

It's possible with a few type extensions (as an aside, please check that your example code compiles when posting questions. I had to make quite a few corrections).

{-# LANGUAGE TypeOperators #-}
{-# LANGUAGE MultiParamTypeClasses #-}
{-# LANGUAGE FlexibleInstances #-}
{-# LANGUAGE TypeSynonymInstances #-}
{-# LANGUAGE OverlappingInstances #-}

type a :* b = (a, b)
a *: b = (a, b)
infixr 5 *:
infixr 5 :*

hlist :: Int :* String :* Int :* Maybe Float :* ()
hlist = 1 *: "hello" *: 2 *: Just 3 *: ()


class TypeFilter lst t where
    hfilter :: lst -> [t]

instance TypeFilter () t where
    hfilter _ = []

instance TypeFilter rest t => TypeFilter (t :* rest) t where
    hfilter (a, rest) = a : hfilter rest

instance TypeFilter rest t => TypeFilter (a :* rest) t where
    hfilter (_, rest) = hfilter rest

Now we can filter items by type by explicitly defining the type of the list we want.

*Main> hfilter hlist :: [Int]
[1,2]
*Main> hfilter hlist :: [String]
["hello"]
*Main> hfilter hlist :: [Maybe Float]
[Just 3.0]
*Main> hfilter hlist :: [Maybe Int]
[]

It works by defining a multi-parameter type-class TypeFilter, which takes the type of the heterogenous list and the type we want to filter by. We then define instances for the empty list/unit () and for a list where the type matches (TypeFilter (t :* rest) t) and finally for a list where the type of the head is different than the type we want to retrieve (TypeFilter (a :* rest) t).

Note that in the last instance there is currently no way to signify that a and t must be different types, but when they are the same OverlappingInstances counts the instance TypeFilter (t :* rest) t as more specific and chooses it over the TypeFilter (a :* rest) t one.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry about the compilation problems, I was posting from my phone. –  rampion Feb 22 '12 at 14:44
1  
Ok, I was able to get from this to a version that doesn't require OverlappingInstances by passing a filter argument hfilter :: a -> h -> h', and that uses heterogenous lists for the output. So hfilter (undefined :: Int) hlist :: () is (), hfilter (undefined :: Int) hlist :: Int :* () is 1 :* () and hfilter (undefined :: Int) hlist :: Int :* Int :* () is 1 :* 2 :* (). –  rampion Feb 22 '12 at 15:02
    
arg, but that requires OverlappingInstances to actually use. –  rampion Feb 22 '12 at 20:19
add comment

Although there exist methods to do what you ask, there is a very high probability that you are not playing Haskell strength here. Could you elaborate on your needs ? Usually you can enumerate all variants that you will need in an algebraic data type. Your list will then be homogeneous, allowing you to pattern-match on elements to operate on it.

share|improve this answer
    
Using an ADT, you'd probably end up with a solution similar in spirit to catMaybes, which filters the list by a particular constructor. –  Dan Burton Feb 22 '12 at 20:16
    
I'm playing with writing a stack-based DSL (somewhat resembling factor) in haskell - the heterogenous list in this case is the stack. –  rampion Feb 22 '12 at 20:17
1  
ah, I think I see, maybe something in the spirit of Sami's SNOC-pair based polymorphic stack described here ? –  Paul R Feb 23 '12 at 8:29
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.