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I have a structural problem that I could use your help with. I'll explain the abstract problem first, then an example to illustrate the problem.

Consider an abstract class A holding a number of instances of an abstract class B, also assume the following methods in A: void a.foo1(B val) and B a.foo2(). The problem arises when we inherit the classes (A' inherits A and B' inherits B) and demand that the relation A has to B should be the same as A' has to B'. That is, in A': void a.foo1(B' val) and B' a.foo2(). The second method will work, but not the first one (unless we do a unsafe type-cast). In other words, in A': a.foo1(B val) should be illegal unless parameter is an instance of B'. I've tried to model this relationship with generics/templates with little sucess.

This problem arises when making a graph framework. Here we have classes Graph and GraphVertex. (In my actual implementation I overload GraphVertex's delete operator.) In C++:

template<class T> class Graph; // Forward reference.

template<class T> class GraphVertex
{
    public:
        GraphVertex(Graph<T> &graph) : m_graph(graph){}
        virtual ~GraphVertex() {}

        ... // Abstract methods, using T parameter.

        void remove()
        { m_graph.removeVertex(this); }
    protected:
        Graph<T> &m_graph;
}

template<class T> class Graph
{
    public:
        virtual ~Graph(){}

        ...

        virtual GraphVertex<T> *add(T val) = 0;
        virtual void removeVertex(GraphVertex<T> *vertex) = 0; // <--- !!!
}

The problem here is the removeVertex method. Lets say we have implemented the classes with AdjacencyMatrixGraph and AMGVertex. When removing a vertex in the AdjacencyMatrixGraph we need more data than is provided in the abstract base class GraphVertex. We know that the parameter type should be AMGVertex but sending another type as parameter would not generate an (compile-time) error.

To solve this problem I've tried to add a new template parameter, specifying the implemented type. That is:

template<class T, class G> class GraphVertex
{
    public:
        GraphVertex(G &graph) : m_graph(graph) {}
        ~GraphVertex() {}

        ...

        void remove() { m_graph.removeVertex(this); }

    protected:
        G &m_graph;
}

template<class T, class V> class Graph
{
    public:
        virtual ~Graph() {}

        ...

        virtual V *add(T val) = 0;
        virtual void removeVertex(V *vertex) = 0;
}

template<class T> AdjacencyMatrixGraph; // Forward declaration.

template<class T> AMGVertex : public GraphVertex<T, AdjacencyMatrixGraph<T>>
{ ... }

template<class T> AdjacencyMatrixGraph : public Graph<T, AMGVertex<T>>
{ ... }

However, this will not work. It is not possible to use the base class Graph due to circular reference of the base classes.

Graph<int> *p = new AdjacencyMatrixGraph<int>(); // Won't work.

The example above has the same problems in Java with generics.

So, is there anyway to model the relation in a type-safe way? Or am I stuck with casting pointers around?

Thank you for reading!

EDIT:

An example usage of the above could look like:

Graph<int> *someGraph = getSomeGraph();
GraphVertex<int> *newVertex = someGraph->add(3);
...
newVertex->remove();
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3 Answers 3

"When removing a vertex in the AdjacencyMatrixGraph we need more data than is provided in the abstract base class GraphVertex". I think you should write an Interface which offers the data that are needed.

If you have two sub-classes with same behavior at one point and the base-class cannot add this bahavior in it's class, because it wont't fit to every subclass you can characterize sub-classes with same bahavior with an extra interface.

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Nice example (+1). The problem is in your OO design, so a type-safe solution is not possible:

Since A' is also of type A, it must follow the contract described in A. Hence foo1 of A' must accept arbitrary B as parameter, not only B'.

The return type of foo2 in A' must be of type B. Since B' is of type B, the covariant return type B' is allowed for foo2 (since n J2SE 5.0.).

Update:

To solve this dilemma, I would do a redesign, since your A' is not really an A. So either

  • A' does not inherit from A, or
  • A does not contain foo1 at all, or
  • A must contain void a.foo1(B' val) instead.

If redesigning is too much a trouble for you, you will have to give up type safety, and, for instance, throw an Illegal Argument Exception if foo1 in A' is called with a B that is not a B'. This is quite similar to how java.util.Collection handles optional operations.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah yes, the design is the problem. My try with templates / generics "almost works". I've come across the same design problem on many occations (in both C++ and Java) so basically what I'm asking for is a working OO design, a design that does in functionality the same, but is type-safe. Or if you have come across the problem, how did you solve it? –  Jens Åkerblom Feb 22 '12 at 15:11
    
@Jens: see the update in my answer. –  DaveFar Feb 22 '12 at 15:31
    
Using the example to fit the redesign scheme, the points in the list would be (somewhat) equivalent to: AdjacencyMatrixGraph does not inherit from Graph, Graph does not contain method removeVertex at all, and Graph must contain all removeVertex(C) versions where C is a sub-type of GraphVertex. None of the options are really OO friendly if trying to have the concreate classes unknown. The use of the second list item is most promising but then you cannot remove a vertex from a reference to its abstract base class. –  Jens Åkerblom Feb 22 '12 at 22:10

After some experimenting I have concluded that the general design cannot be changed to be 100% type-safe. However, there are some situations where you can help ensure that the offended method is only called with the correct sub-type.

Taking the graph example, what we need to do is to insure that a sub-class of GraphVertex (in this case AMGVertex) only can access the related sub-class of Graph (that is for AMGVertex, class AdjacencyMatrixGraph). Hence insuring that the correct type is inserted at the removeVertex(GraphVertex *v) method. To do this, a non-public visibility can be used for methods that are accessed by the abstract class GraphVertex. Also the visibility of the constructors of all the sub-types of GraphVertex must be non-public. Of course the constructor of AMGVertex must be visible from AdjacencyMatrixGraph and the removeVertex must be visible from AMGVertex. In C++ this can be done with friends.

template<class T> class GraphVertex
{
    public:
        virtual ~GraphVertex() {}
        void remove() { m_graph.removeVertex(this); }

    protected:
        GraphVertex(Graph<T> &graph) : m_graph(graph) {}
        Graph<T> &m_graph;
}

template<class T> class Graph
{
    friend class GraphVertex<T>;
    public:
        virtual GraphVertex<T> add(T value) = 0;

    protected: // Or private?
        virtual void removeVertex(GraphVertex<T> *v) = 0;
}

template<class T> class AMGVertex : public GraphVertex<T>
{
    friend class AdjacencyMatrixGraph<T>;

    protected: // Or private?
        AMGVertex(AdjacencyMatrixGraph<T> &graph)
        : GraphVertex<T>(graph) {}
}

template<class T> class AdjacencyMatrixGraph : public Graph<T>
{
    public:
        AMGVertex *add(T value) { ... } // Calls AMGVertex's constructor.

    protected: // Or private?
        void removeVertex(GraphVertex<T> *v) // Only visible from this class and through base class.
        { ... }
}

So, AMGVertex can only be created from AdjacencyMatrixGraph, and hence a call to AMGVertex::remove() will always call AdjacencyMatrixGraph::removeVertex(GraphVertex *v) with the correct sub-class as parameter.

It is however still possible to circumvent this, simply by creating a new vertex type with a AdjacencyMatrixGraph as m_graph. This is because the friendship from vertex to graph is in the abstract base-class.

So a 100% type-safe solution is (at least from what I've gathered) not possible.

In Java I believe similar results can be achieved with nested classes (to overcome visibility limitations).

Thank you for the replies! If someone has a better solution, let us know.

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