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recently I set out to port ucos-ii to Ubuntu PC.

As we know, it's not possible to simulate the "process" in the ucos-ii by simply adding a flag in "while" loop in the pthread's call-back function to perform pause and resume(like the solution below). Because the "process" in ucos-ii can be paused or resumed at any time!

How to sleep or pause a PThread in c on Linux

I have found one solution on the web-site below, but it can't be built because it's out of date. It uses the process in Linux to simulate the task(acts like the process in our Linux) in ucos-ii.

http://www2.hs-esslingen.de/~zimmerma/software/index_uk.html

If pthread can act like the process which can be paused and resumed at any time, please tell me some related functions, I can figure it out myself. If it can't, I think I should focus on the older solution. Thanks a lot.

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3  
Wait, why exactly can't you just use a condition variable and a shared atomic flag to pause/resume a process? –  Lalaland Feb 22 '12 at 14:53
    
Let's image what your CPU schedules processes in your system. For example, when a process runs out its own time-splices in CPU, it will be asked to sleep. Although maybe there's no sleep-related or synchronization-related sentence in your program, the OS will sticks to ask your process to do so. Now, what I'm going to do is using pthreads to simulate the processes in OS. –  fish47 Feb 23 '12 at 12:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If stopping at specific points with a condition variable is insufficient, then you can't do this with pthreads. The pthread interface does not include suspend/resume functionality.

See, for example, answer E.4 here:

The POSIX standard provides no mechanism by which a thread A can suspend the execution of another thread B, without cooperation from B. The only way to implement a suspend/restart mechanism is to have B check periodically some global variable for a suspend request and then suspend itself on a condition variable, which another thread can signal later to restart B.

That FAQ answer goes on to describe a couple of non-standard ways of doing it, one in Solaris and one in LinuxThreads (which is now obsolete; do not confuse it with current threading on Linux); neither of those apply to your situation.

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Here is example of thread function within a class with pause/resume functionality...

class SomeClass
{
public:
    // ... construction/destruction

    void Resume();
    void Pause();
    void Stop();

private:
    static void* ThreadFunc(void* pParam);

    pthread_t thread;
    pthread_mutex_t mutex;
    pthread_cond_t cond_var;
    int command;
};

SomeClass::SomeClass()
{
    pthread_mutex_init(&mutex, NULL);
    pthread_cond_init(&cond_var, NULL);

    // create thread in suspended state..
    command = 0;
    pthread_create(&thread, NULL, ThreadFunc, this);
}

SomeClass::~SomeClass()
{
    // we should stop the thread and exit ThreadFunc before calling of blocking pthread_join function
    // also it prevents the mutex staying locked..
    Stop();
    pthread_join(thread, NULL);

    pthread_cond_destroy(&cond_var);
    pthread_mutex_destroy(&mutex);
}

void* SomeClass::ThreadFunc(void* pParam)
{
    SomeClass* pThis = (SomeClass*)pParam;
    timespec time_ns = {0, 50*1000*1000};   // 50 milliseconds

    while(1)
    {
        pthread_mutex_lock(&pThis->mutex);

        if (pThis->command == 2) // command to stop thread..
        {
            // be sure to unlock mutex before exit..
            pthread_mutex_unlock(&pThis->mutex);
            return NULL;
        }
        else if (pThis->command == 0) // command to pause thread..
        {
            pthread_cond_wait(&pThis->cond_var, &pThis->mutex);
            // dont forget to unlock the mutex..
            pthread_mutex_unlock(&pThis->mutex);
            continue;
        }

        if (pThis->command == 1) // command to run..
        {
            // normal runing process..
            fprintf(stderr, "*");
        }

        pthread_mutex_unlock(&pThis->mutex);

        // it's important to give main thread few time after unlock 'this'
        pthread_yield();
        // ... or...
        //nanosleep(&time_ns, NULL);
    }
    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

void SomeClass::Stop()
{
    pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex);
    command = 2;
    pthread_cond_signal(&cond_var);
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);
}

void SomeClass::Pause()
{
    pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex);
    command = 0;
    // in pause command we dont need to signal cond_var because we not in wait state now..
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);
}

void SomeClass::Resume()
{
    pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex);
    command = 1;
    pthread_cond_signal(&cond_var);
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);
}
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This is not a solution for the question asked –  Chris Stratton Nov 19 '13 at 12:04

The Modula-3 garbage collector needs to suspend pthreads at an arbitrary time, not just when they are waiting on a condition variable or mutex. It does it by registering a (Unix) signal handler that suspends the thread and then using pthread_kill to send a signal to the target thread. I think it works (it has been reliable for others but I'm debugging an issue with it right now...) It's a bit kludgy, though....

Google for ThreadPThread.m3 and look at the routines "StopWorld" and "StartWorld". Handler itself is in ThreadPThreadC.c.

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