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I'm trying to work through an example in Expert F#, which is based on v1.9.2, but the CTP releases after that have changed enough that some of them don't even compile anymore.

I'm running into some trouble with listing 13-13. Here's the snippet of the urlCollector object definition:

let urlCollector =
    MailboxProcessor.Start(fun self ->
        let rec waitForUrl (visited : Set<string>) =
            async { if visited.Count < limit then
                        let! url = self.Receive()
                        if not (visited.Contains(url)) then
                            do! Async.Start
                                (async { let! links = collectLinks url
                                         for link in links do
                                         do self <-- link })

                        return! waitForUrl(visited.Add(url)) }

            waitForUrl(Set.Empty))

I'm compiling with Version 1.9.6.16, and the compiler complains thusly:

  1. incomplete structured construct at or before this point in expression [after the last paren]
  2. error in the return expression for this 'let'. Possible incorrect indentation [refers to the let defining waitForUrl]

Can anyone spot what's going wrong here?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It looks like the last line needs to be unindented 4 spaces.

EDIT: actually, it looks like there's more going on here. Assuming this is the same sample as here, then here's a version I just modified to be in sync with the 1.9.6.16 release:

open System.Collections.Generic
open System.Net
open System.IO
open System.Threading
open System.Text.RegularExpressions

let limit = 10    

let linkPat = "href=\s*\"[^\"h]*(http://[^&\"]*)\""
let getLinks (txt:string) =
    [ for m in Regex.Matches(txt,linkPat)  -> m.Groups.Item(1).Value ]

let (<--) (mp: MailboxProcessor<_>) x = mp.Post(x)

// A type that helps limit the number of active web requests
type RequestGate(n:int) =
    let semaphore = new Semaphore(initialCount=n,maximumCount=n)
    member x.AcquireAsync(?timeout) =
        async { let! ok = semaphore.AsyncWaitOne(?millisecondsTimeout=timeout)
                if ok then
                   return
                     { new System.IDisposable with
                         member x.Dispose() =
                             semaphore.Release() |> ignore }
                else
                   return! failwith "couldn't acquire a semaphore" }

// Gate the number of active web requests
let webRequestGate = RequestGate(5)

// Fetch the URL, and post the results to the urlCollector.
let collectLinks (url:string) =
    async { // An Async web request with a global gate
            let! html =
                async { // Acquire an entry in the webRequestGate. Release
                        // it when 'holder' goes out of scope
                        use! holder = webRequestGate.AcquireAsync()

                        // Wait for the WebResponse
                        let req = WebRequest.Create(url,Timeout=5)

                        use! response = req.AsyncGetResponse()

                        // Get the response stream
                        use reader = new StreamReader(
                            response.GetResponseStream())

                        // Read the response stream
                        return! reader.AsyncReadToEnd()  }

            // Compute the links, synchronously
            let links = getLinks html

            // Report, synchronously
            do printfn "finished reading %s, got %d links" 
                    url (List.length links)

            // We're done
            return links }

let urlCollector =
    MailboxProcessor.Start(fun self ->
        let rec waitForUrl (visited : Set<string>) =
            async { if visited.Count < limit then
                        let! url = self.Receive()
                        if not (visited.Contains(url)) then
                            Async.Start 
                                (async { let! links = collectLinks url
                                         for link in links do
                                             do self <-- link })
                        return! waitForUrl(visited.Add(url)) }

        waitForUrl(Set.Empty))

urlCollector <-- "http://news.google.com"
// wait for keypress to end program
System.Console.ReadKey() |> ignore
share|improve this answer
    
Agreed...sometimes block definition by indentation is more obscure than helpful. I've gotten in the habit of adding begin/end tokens to set off where long or deeply nested blocks start and end. They are not required in the #light syntax but are still available. –  flatline Jun 2 '09 at 14:26
    
Thanks - I'll give that a try. I guess one thing that was misleading, and most unfortunate given the importance of proper indentation, was that the example in the book spans a page break, so it's difficult to tell where the indentation lines up. –  Ben Collins Jun 2 '09 at 23:29
    
This is broken again :( –  Benjol Jun 8 '11 at 11:57
    
x.AsyncWaitOne(y,z) -> Async.AwaitWaitHandle(x,y,z). I think AsyncReadToEnd is in the powerpack. Set.Empty -> set []. –  Brian Jun 8 '11 at 13:52

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